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Using Copy Traversed Features to count turns for a route result in Network Analyst


I have the output of the route layer. And I want to determine the number of right and left turns for each route. For that, I used the COPY TRAVERSED ROUTE FEATURES tool from Network Analyst. However, this gave an empty output table for the turns. Are there any prerequisites for the network dataset to use the COPY TRAVERSED SOURCE FEATURE tool? Or is this possible by using Global Turns in the analysis by any way?

I am looking for the result similar to below (from a study of Dalumpines and Scott).


When considering turns as features in a network dataset, they must be modeled first. That means you have to create an actual turns feature class that has its own geometry to be traversed. When turns are not specifically modeled (ie, the Global Turns properties you mention) they aren't features that are traversed, just analysis variable properties, which is why your table is blank.

Usually turns are only modeled in special circumstances, for instance when they need to be restricted at a particular intersection. However it is possible to model every turn in the network. I've never attempted to do this on my own, and I'm not sure if there are any automated tools to generate the turn features for an entire network at once. Before committing to creating a full turns feature class, you might just create a few sample ones that would fall on your routes and then use that to test if it produces the desired attributes or something useful to work with.

I cannot say if those attributes in your example image were generated using this tool/method. Based on the Copy Traversed Source Features help files, and specifically the output documentation, it does not appear that this tool will generate the information you want. I also found this GeoNet forum post with the same goal as you, and my interpretation of the information there is the tool doesn't produce that information. (The suggested solution there is also to use Directions, and explains briefly how it comes up with left/right.)


GeoDTN+Nav: Geographic DTN Routing with Navigator Prediction for Urban Vehicular Environments

Position-based routing has proven to be well suited for highly dynamic environment such as Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANET) due to its simplicity. Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing (GPSR) and Greedy Perimeter Coordinator Routing (GPCR) both use greedy algorithms to forward packets by selecting relays with the best progress towards the destination or use a recovery mode in case such solutions fail. These protocols could forward packets efficiently given that the underlying network is fully connected. However, the dynamic nature of vehicular network, such as vehicle density, traffic pattern, and radio obstacles could create unconnected networks partitions. To this end, we propose GeoDTN+Nav, a hybrid geographic routing solution enhancing the standard greedy and recovery modes exploiting the vehicular mobility and on-board vehicular navigation systems to efficiently deliver packets even in partitioned networks. GeoDTN+Nav outperforms standard geographic routing protocols such as GPSR and GPCR because it is able to estimate network partitions and then improves partitions reachability by using a store-carry-forward procedure when necessary. We propose a virtual navigation interface (VNI) to provide generalized route information to optimize such forwarding procedure. We finally evaluate the benefit of our approach first analytically and then with simulations. By using delay tolerant forwarding in sparse networks, GeoDTN+Nav greatly increases the packet delivery ratio of geographic routing protocols and provides comparable routing delay to benchmark DTN algorithms.


101 Word Intro

Camel is a framework with a consistent API and programming model for integrating applications together. The API is based on theories in Enterprise Integration Patterns - i.e., bunch of design patterns that tend to use messaging. It provides out of the box implementations of most of these patterns, and additionally ships with over 200 different components you can use to easily talk to all kinds of other systems. To use Camel, first write your business logic in POJOs and implement simple interfaces centered around messages. Then use Camel’s DSL to create "Routes" which are sets of rules for gluing your application together.


The proposed framework

System description

The framework presented here is an extension of previous works and is intended to assist in the early detection of avian influenza events. The framework consists of three parts: data management, knowledge management and user interface. First, several data sources were collected, pre-processed and stored. Then, rules and facts were extracted from the data and stored in a knowledge base. Rules are used as a technique for knowledge representation in a system 33 while facts are known information about data. Finally, the knowledge base was used to respond to questions regarding the degree of avian influenza risk at different geographical scales. In the present study, the risk is defined as the likelihood of disease occurring for the first time or continuous events in a region. An overview of the framework is given in Fig. 1. Figure 1 depicts how different elements in each part are related to one another.

Data management

The data management part was responsible for several operations including data acquisition, pre-processing and integration. Data was collected from Twitter and spatiotemporal data sources. Subsequently, pre-processed techniques such as data cleaning and transformation were applied to raw data to transform it to a useful format for the knowledge management.

Spatiotemporal covariates data

We identified several explanatory variables of avian influenza including temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind speed, pressure 34 , chicken density, duck density 35 and waterfowl density 36 . These risk factors have been proven to correlate with avian influenza events in previous studies 37,38 . The corresponding data sources including climatic conditions, geographic extent of migratory bird species, distribution of poultry, and disease historical records were integrated in a spatiotemporal dataset. Integration was performed considering a spatial and temporal resolution of 1-degree × 1-degree and 1-week, respectively. Then, all explanatory variables and response variable were adjusted in the defined resolution.

Predictor variables with different spatial and temporal resolutions were adjusted with respect to the defined spatial and temporal resolution. Variables with temporal scale less than a week and spatial scale less than a cell were averaged. Conversely, when the resolution was lower than a cell or a week, we repeated the same values for all the cells or weeks that fit into that resolution.

Darksky API was used to return the observed daily weather conditions given a specified date in the past and a location point. The Gridded Livestock of the World offered GeoTIFF format files that were converted to longitude-latitude-value format and then imported to a designed database. Birdlife species data included shapefiles that could be visualized by geographical information system (GIS) software such as ArcGIS. We filtered polygons related to 133 duck species, and in the field called ‘bird_existence’ in the database, we specified whether each cell was inside a bird polygon or not. Other information on these datasets is presented in Table 1.

Global Twitter data

Twitter data as a source of disease surveillance can bypass formal information channels and enhance the speed of control actions. To collect global (i.e. country-level) tweets, a crawler was used to visit Twitter on a per minute basis. Several keywords regarding avian influenza were fed into the Twitter Search API and posts were continuously stored in a database. The dataset, in total, contained 209,000 observations, which were collected over 18 months. Subsequently, tweets were filtered and geo-located using their context and re-tweets observations were removed. Subsequently, tweets were geo-located based on their content and irrelevant ones were filtered using a semi-supervised classification. Additionally, duplicate tweets (e.g., re-tweets) were removed from data. The details of data collection and pre-processing of data was previously described 40 .

Country-level data collection pipeline.

Country-scale Twitter data (Indonesia)

A general overview of the provincial-level Twitter data collection pipeline is provided in Fig. 2. Employing the full-archive endpoint of Twitter premium search API, tweets regarding avian influenza for various provinces in the country of Indonesia were requested using a combination of keywords and operators. For example, for Java province in Indonesia, we used the following input: “flu burung Java OR birdflu Java OR H5N1 Java OR H7N9 Java OR bird flu Java OR H5N2 Java”. Tweets were collected for the year 2016, which resulted in a total of approximately 5,000 observations. We selected this period since it was matching to the duration of spatiotemporal covariates data and also due to restrictions on the number of requests in Twitter API.

After fetching data from Twitter and storing it in a dataset, tweets were translated into English from the language spoken in that specific country (i.e. Indonesian Language) utilizing Google Cloud Translate API. Given the translated content, we tagged each tweet with a standard list of province names.

Ground truth data

To collect country-level disease events, we utilized a programmed robot to visit OIE web pages 41 every four hours. The robot filtered and stored AI-relevant reports including 58 immediate and 382 follow-up notifications for the same duration that global-scale tweets have been collected. Besides, the information on avian influenza events for provincial-level (for Indonesia) was obtained from the Emergency Prevention System for Animal Health (EMPRES-i) 39,42 .

Knowledge management

The knowledge management part of the system aimed at turning data into insights that facilitate decision making. As illustrated in Fig. 1, the knowledge management component of the system consists of a knowledge base, analysis methods and risk prediction. The knowledge base was designed as a table called ‘knowledge-base’ (see Fig. 3) to store rules and facts derived by applying a set of analyses to the collected data. The knowledge base was then used in answering the questions that end users might ask. SQL queries, noise removal, anomaly detection and rule discovery were analysis methods used in the knowledge management.

The historical events of avian influenza were stored as facts with time, location and magnitude elements. Also, several analyses have been performed on Twitter data in order to extract patterns and store them in the knowledge base. For instance, the irrelevant content was filtered out using a semi-supervised classifier. Subsequently, Seasonal-Hybrid Extreme Studentized Deviate (SH-ESD) algorithm was employed to identify spikes from daily time-series of tweets. Then, the patterns containing time, location and magnitude elements were stored in the knowledge base. Moreover, analyses on the spatiotemporal data were performed to derive patterns in the form of ‘if-then’ rules from RuleFit and FP-Growth models. These rules were built using explanatory variables, rank, time and location elements.

Descriptive and country-level predictive questions were addressed using the patterns stored in the knowledge base. However, for the predictive questions at the provincial-level, it was necessary to perform additional analysis. The ‘knowledge-base’ table and the spatiotemporal dataset 43 were used to calculate the weekly risk of disease events for each province. Algorithm 1 presents the pseudo-code for a step-by-step process of the risk calculation.

To calculate the future risk of disease occurrence for a province, a multi-class decision tree classification was applied to risk degrees obtained from the Twitter component, spatiotemporal component and past disease events. Multi-class tasks assume that each example is assigned to one and only one label. Decision tree classifiers are frequently used in classification problems with a good accuracy compared to other machine learning algorithms 44 . A decision tree is composed of rules extracted from a training set. Feature values at each branching point of the tree are used to split the data. Subsequently, the tree is traversed from the root to leaves with each branching point determining the direction that needs to be followed. Finally, the new instance is assigned with the associated label of the tree leaf that is reached 45 . Decision tree classifier was implemented here with the help of sklearn python library and a grid search parameter setting.

The risk of Twitter and spatiotemporal components was categorized into very low, low, medium, high and very high while the risk of past and future disease events was represented by low, medium and high levels. Table 2 shows the thresholds used to discretize the values. To perform the classification, the risk associated with events occurring in the next 2 weeks was accounted as the ground truth outcome. We calculated the risk by counting the number of events during the defined time (2 weeks) and geographical (province) scales and divided it by the provincial density of poultry.

User interface

The user interface part of the system can communicate between the knowledge management and user and let users specify their input and receive information. In this section, we explain how different scenarios could be followed by the proposed system in order to respond to various questions asked by end users. Considering the analytics taxonomy of descriptive, predictive and prescriptive analyses 46 , the first type of questions can be placed in the descriptive analysis group as these questions tell us what happened in the past. The second and third type of questions can be in the predictive analysis category as they forecast the future risk of disease. The process of finding answers for sample questions is given in Fig. 4.

What countries have reported avian influenza in the past month? Retrospective questions could be answered using historical records of disease. We stored the facts about previous events in the ‘knowledge-base’ table and assigned the ‘Actual’ to the component field. These facts are the result of direct queries on the occurrence data and do not require any additional analyses. As depicted in Fig. 4, if the desired duration of the question is in the past, records in the table with the ‘Actual’ component field are returned.

What countries are at risk of new or recurring avian influenza events in the next few weeks/Is the country X at risk of avian influenza within the next few weeks? These questions can be answered by insights that were extracted from the ‘global-scale Twitter’ component of the system. Matching rules are found based on the geographical scale (e.g. country X) and the duration of 2 weeks prior to present date (i.e. the date of question).

Which provinces in country X are at risk of new or recurring avian influenza events/Is the province Y in the country X at risk of avian influenza within the next few weeks? To answer these questions, both ‘country-scale Twitter’ and ‘country-scale spatiotemporal covariates’ components could be used. Matching rules from each component return a risk degree that are then combined and used to calculate the final risk.

Validation

The performance of decision support systems needs to be evaluated by continuous assessment of system operations. Validation of these systems is an opportunity to identify strengths and weaknesses of their functionalities and improve them. Here, the main evaluation was to ensure whether the system is meeting its goal, which is the ability to detect events. Among the questions discussed earlier, the validation of descriptive questions depends on the correctness of the collected gold standard data. Also, the validity of the second type of questions that use Twitter data to detect country-level events was already assessed 40 . The assessments concluded that 75% of real-world events were identifiable from Twitter data. The validity of the third type of questions is explained in detail as follows.

The most important element of the system validation is to identify the ability of the system in predicting the risk of future disease events. As appears in Algorithm 1, line 15, predicted risk for each week was compared to the actual risk of events. A repeated random subsampling approach was used for validation of the prediction model. The data was split into test/train datasets with a proportion of 30% for ten times. Each time, the model was built with train dataset and validated by several measures (Eqs. 1–7) on test dataset. Finally, the model was evaluated by averaging the measures. The popular accuracy measure was not considered as it could be a misleading and unreliable measure for imbalanced datasets. This is because accuracy assigns higher ranks to majority classes 47 .

Taking a class (C_i) into consideration, the positive predictive value represents the number of correctly predicted (C_i) out of all predicted as (C_i) . On the other hand, the sensitivity is the number of correctly predicted (C_i) out of the number of actual examples with (C_i) class. Specificity measures the ability of the system to correctly identify classes other than (C_i) . Finally, F-score is a weighted average of positive predictive value and sensitivity and G-mean 48 is geometric mean of sensitivity and specificity. Also, the micro-average aggregates the contributions of all classes to compute the average metric, whereas macro-average calculates the measures independently for each class and then takes the average. In fact, the micro-average weights all examples equally and therefore, favouring the performance on major classes while the macro-average weights all the classes equally without taking the number of examples in each class into account 49 . Therefore, in the present study we consider macro-average measures in order to be able to assess the effectiveness of small classes.

Calculating measures for class (C_i) , if the actual class is (C_i) and the predicted output is (C_i) too, we count it as true positive (TP), and if the predicted output is a class rather than (C_i) , we count it as false negative (FN). On the other hand, assuming the actual class is a class rather than (C_i) and the predicted output is (C_i) , we call it false positive (FP), otherwise true negative (TN).


3. Scenario

In this paper we address an opportunistic scenario where resources are disseminated across the network and nodes can access them. In the illustration of the scenario, we refer to what is shown in Figure 1 where infostations are deployed statically, which allow to set up the resource search. Infostations are connected typically using some wireless links and connections among infostations are considered stable. As an example, a mesh network can provide backhaul connectivity between the Infostations, where every mesh router has the functionality to setup the resource search. Also, there is a certain number of peripheral nodes which can provide and/or search for resources. Some of these peripheral nodes can be isolated and not in the range of any infostation so that their resources cannot be shared and their requests cannot be served directly. We assume that one or more data mules can move around and serve the isolated nodes once they come in their closest proximity. Obviously, the mobile node remains in the proximity of the isolated node for a limited time interval during which resource search must be performed and the resource should be provided to the requesting node. If these two processes are not successfully completed during the limited proximity time, the isolated node cannot exchange data with the rest of the network. A solution to this problem could exploit a delay-tolerant paradigm. In fact, the mobile node can cache the lookup request as issued from the isolated node and keep on performing the lookup during its tour throughout the network. Once the lookup request is answered successfully, the data mule retrieves the resource and stores it until it comes again in proximity of the isolated node which can then be served.

In order to implement the above-presented scenario, we have chosen to compare the performance of two P2P protocols for wireless networks, appropriately extended to cope with the opportunistic networking scenario. More in depth, Bamboo and Georoy, the two protocols considered that will be described in the following sections, retrieve resources according to a distributed mechanism where, to speed up the lookup process and make it suitable to an unreliable scenario like the one addressed by our study, a replication methodology for managing multiple copies of the same resource has been introduced. Speeding up the lookup process is important as the data mule is in close proximity of a given infostation only for a limited time period. This time interval during which the lookup request/response needs to be completed depends on the speed of the data mule and the mobility pattern.


WebSocket

Вопрос. Что такое протоколы WebSocket?

WebSocket – это протокол связи в режиме реального времени, обеспечивающих двунаправленную связь между клиентом и сервером по установленному на длительное время TCP-соединению. Используя постоянное открытое подключение, клиент и сервер могут обмениваться данными в режиме реального времени, при этом клиенту не нужно постоянно устанавливать новые подключения с целью проверить наличие новых данных для обмена. Подключения WebSocket часто используются в приложениях чата, многопользовательских играх, на платформах для совместной работы и торговых платформах. Подробнее об использовании протокола WebSocket с Amazon CloudFront см. в нашей документации.

Вопрос. Как сделать так, чтобы база раздачи Amazon CloudFront поддерживала протокол WebSocket?

Протоколы WebSocket можно использовать глобально, а для включения протокола WebSocket на вашем ресурсе CloudFront не требуется никаких дополнительных настроек, поскольку протокол поддерживается по умолчанию.

Вопрос. Когда соединение по протоколу WebSocket устанавливается через Amazon CloudFront?

Amazon CloudFront устанавливает соединения по протоколу WebSocket только в тех случаях, когда клиент включает заголовок «Upgrade: websocket», а сервер отвечает кодом состояния HTTP 101, который подтверждает возможность переключения на протокол WebSocket.

Вопрос. Поддерживает ли Amazon CloudFront защищенные протоколы WebSocket через TLS?

Да. Amazon CloudFront поддерживает зашифрованные подключения WebSocket (WSS) с помощью протокола SSL/TLS.


Data Availability.

Code for data analyses, model fitting, and simulations is available in the “hmob” R package version 0.2.0 (55). The CDRs in this study were published with permission from MTC Mobile. Strict license agreement prohibits direct sharing of these data by the authors however, other researchers can request these data from MTC Mobile independently. These data were deemed exempt from Institutional Review Board approval because they were deidentified by the mobile phone provider and aggregated within each cell phone tower catchment area prior to our analysis informed consent was not required.


Section 11. Field Assistance Guide for Managers

(1) This transmits revised IRM 1.4.11, Resource Guide for Managers, Field Assistance Guide for Managers.

Material Changes

(1) IRM 1.4.11.1.3 Roles and Responsibilities specified the executive title responsible for program oversight and added descriptions of each official role.

(2) IRM 1.4.11.1.4 Program Management and Review consolidated information from previous IRM 1.4.11.19 content.

(3) IRM 1.4.11.1.5 Program Controls consolidated information from previous IRM 1.4.11.19 content.

(4) IRM 1.4.11.2, Taxpayer Assistance Center (TAC) Appointment Service, IPU 20U0296 issued 02-20-2020 added procedures for alien clearance/sailing permit appointments in (3)(g) to alert manager of pending appointment actions needed.

(5) IRM 1.4.11.3.2 Preparation for Filing Season deleted (2) and (3) Filing Season Readiness Database no longer used.

(6) IRM 1.4.11.4.1.3, Controlled Access Procedures, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 added written to (1)(j) instructions to align with Form 12149 Part 1 Section F Question 6.

(7) IRM 1.4.11.4.5, Taxpayer Assistance Center Safes added new procedures for safe purchase, repair and storage.

(8) IRM 1.4.11.7, Payment Processing - Manager’s Responsibility, IPU 20U0459 issued 03-20-2020 updated large dollar payment from $50,000 to $10,000 in (7) due to change in policy.

(9) IRM 1.4.11.7.8.6.1, Appointments for Single Large Cash Payments, IPU 20U0459 issued 03-20-2020 updated large dollar payment from $50,000 to $10,000 in (2) and 7) due to change in policy deleted Note about scheduling same day appointments in (1) due to information already in previous section.

(10) IRM 1.4.11.7.8.6.2, Large Cash Payment Appointment Exceptions, IPU 20U0459 issued 03-20-2020 revised title to include Large Cash moved manager instructions from (1) to (2) for easier flow revised instructions for TACs that do not accept cash in (3) to update FAST revised instructions for accepting large cash payments (5) due to new cash counting procedures.

(11) IRM 1.4.11.7.8.6.3, Taxpayer Assistance Center Cash Counting Room, IPU 20U0459 issued 03-20-2020 updated cash counting room procedures in (4) and (5) to for clarity moved cash counting room procedures to (5) and (6) from (7) for better flow updated supplies list in (8) to include bag.

(12) IRM 1.4.11.7.8.6.4, Courier Service Pickup, IPU 20U0459 issued 03-20-2020 added courier service picks up cash payments daily in (1) to mitigate theft.

(13) IRM 1.4.11.7.8.6.5, Accepting Small Business/Self Employed (SBSE) Payments, IPU 20U0459 issued 03-20-2020 revised procedures when appointment is not available in (2) to coordinate appointment with manager.

(14) IRM 1.4.11.12.1, Changes in Hours of Operations, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 replaced procedures for requesting changes to operating hours in TACs by adding FAST information added CHOR emergency closure job aid and deleted table in (1) due to information moved to job aid, deleted email template in (3) since no longer used added AM BOD Administrator to list of stakeholders in (5) to include AM added cancelling procedures in (8) for cancellations and updating IRS.gov in (9) to update IRS.gov website information.

(15) IRM 1.4.11.12.1.1, Approval Authority for Changes in Hours of Operation, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 deleted due to changes in previous subsection.

(16) IRM 1.4.11.13, Publishing Taxpayer Assistance Center Information, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 deleted (6) procedure to complete closure request template for IRS.gov updates since no longer necessary.

(17) IRM 1.4.11.13.2, Posting Taxpayer Assistance Center (TAC) Closings, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 revised exceptions for posting notification of TAC closings on IRS.gov in (2) to include all exceptions.

(18) IRM 1.4.11.16, Capturing Field Assistance Contacts, added Orchestra to match user guide in (2), (3), (5) added save to (7) for saving report clarified reporting of closing codes in (9).

(19) IRM 1.4.11.16.1, Form 13864 - Field Assistance Contact Sheet, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 added conditions for use of Form 13864 in (1) to be consistent with IRM 21.3.4.6 procedures.

(20) IRM 1.4.11.17.2, Qmatic Ticket Process, deleted reference to obsolete Pub 5006 in (1)(c).

(21) IRM 1.4.11.19.8, Review Process and Types of Review, IPU 20U0618 issued 05-15-2020 updated (3) to be consistent with IRM 21.3.4.6 deleted unnecessary without Qmatic in (3).

(22) IRM 1.4.11.23.4 Employee Automated Readiness Assessment (EARA) deleted no longer used.

(23) IRM 1.4.11.23.4.1 Alternative Employee Automated Readiness Assessment deleted no longer used.

(24) Editorial changes made throughout to remove italics from titles, add references, reorganize content, use plain language, update spelling, grammar, citations and websites.

Effect on Other Documents

Audience

Effective Date

Todd L Harber
Director, Field Assistance
Wage and Investment Division


One2One Information and Resources

Pickerington Schools is proud to say that we are the second-largest school district in the state of Ohio to go completely One2One with our all of our students. That means that each student will be loaned a device (iPad or Chromebook) for the school year. Students in grade 5-12 will be able to take the device home with them from the start of the school year to the last couple weeks of the school year. With going One-to-One, there are a few procedures that parents need to be aware of.

  • Devices are the property of Pickerington Schools.
  • Students will retain the same device for four years. It is the student’s responsibility to keep the device in proper working order and good physical condition.
  • Students need to charge the device at home. No charging will be allowed at school. All devices have an 8-12 hour battery to last throughout the school day. All power cords need to stay at home.
  • PLSD offers a yearly Technology Protection Plan to help cover the cost against accidental damage. More information is below in the Technology Protection Plan section.
  • All devices are filtered 24/7 against inappropriate websites. Alerts will be sent to administrators about inappropriate use. Teachers have the ability to monitor student use throughout the day.
  • The PLSD Acceptable Use Policy is effective 24/7 when using these devices.
  • Printing will not be allowed on these devices, as part of the plan is to share documents digitally and use less paper.
  • Students are only permitted to download the apps that have been approved by the instructional technology department.
  • Students may put stickers on their cases as long as they are not covering the serial number, asset tag, or PLSD log. Also, stickers cannot interfere with the functionality of the device.
  • If your device becomes lost or stolen, please let the media center specialist or aide of your school know ASAP. We can track your device, but we only activate that on devices that have been reported as lost or stolen.
  • All devices will be collected during the last two weeks of the school year.

It is an exciting time in Pickerington Schools as we continue our journey to utilize blended learning with our students, giving students access to communication, resources, and learning tools like never before. Our adoption of One2One devices will allow students to access new online and digital content created by our talented staff, in addition to content provided by textbook companies and software vendors.

Pickerington students will be able to communicate and collaborate in a digital environment that was not available to the world just a 5-10 years ago. We’re excited about working with our students as they learn digital citizenship in a safe and responsible atmosphere.

We’ll continue to be amazed by what our students create and how they incorporate the tools of their generation into the learning that will shape their future. Tools like a Chromebook or iPad will allow them access to software that will encourage their artistic abilities, improve their reading and writing, and push them to think critically as they spark new interests and insights into their journey of being a lifelong learner.

Pickerington educators are dedicated to continuing to offer rigorous and engaging learning opportunities for studen ts.

Receiving Your Device

Please see the section below about the distribution of devices for the 2020-2021 school year.

Ownership of the Device

PLSD retains the sole right of ownership and possession of the device. The device is assigned to the student for educational purposes only for the academic year. Moreover, PLSD’s administrative staff and faculty retain the right to collect, monitor, and/or inspect the device at any time, including via electronic remote access, and to monitor student work or to alter, add or delete installed software or hardware.

Please the section below about the PLSD One2One Device Agreement.

Student’s Responsibilities

Students and their parent/guardian are solely responsible for the device issued to them and must adhere to the following:

    • Students must comply with the District’s Acceptable Use Policy and the Student Device Handbook (in section below) when using their device.
    • Students must bring their device to school every day and make sure it is fully charged. Failure to do so may result in loss of instruction.
      • Note: A fully charged device should last at least 8 hours.

      Responsibility for Electronic Data

        • Students are solely responsible for any apps or extensions on their device that is not installed by a member of the PLSD Instructional Technology staff or by classroom educators.
        • Students are responsible for backing up their data to protect from loss. This includes securing passwords to protect data.
        • Users of District Technology have no rights, ownership, or expectations of privacy to any data that is, or was, stored on the device, school network, or any school­-issued applications, and are given no guarantees that data will be retained or destroyed.

        Devices Left At Home

        If students leave their device at home, they are responsible for getting the coursework completed as if they had their device present. A loaner device will not be provided. If a student repeatedly leaves his/her device at home, he/she will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action.

        Protecting Your Data and Files

        Students are responsible for the appropriateness of all files, data, and internet history on their device. Although these devices will be logged and filtered on and off campus, it is still the responsibility of the student to use good judgment when accessing or transmitting data. Do not take photos or video of other students or staff without their permission. The possessing, forwarding or uploading of unauthorized data, photos, audio or video to any website, network storage area, or person is strictly forbidden. Do not access another individual’s materials, information, or files without permission.

        Cost of Repairs/Replacement

        Pickerington Schools recognizes that with the implementation of the One2One initiative, there is a need to protect the investment by both the District and the student/parent. Therefore, we have set the following charges in place, which are subject to change.

        Pickerington School s has created the Technology Protection Plan. See the section below for more specific details about the Technology Protection Plan.

        If you do not select the Technology Protection Plan, you will be responsible for paying for the needed equipment, repair or replacement of the device. The prices do not include labor, which ranges from $15 – $50. You will be issued one charger with your device. The Technology Protection Plan does not cover the charger if the charger is lost or damaged. Total replacement cost for the device is $300, plus the cost of the charger if needed.

        The following will be considered damage(s) due to intentional reckless, willful, wanton and/or malicious conduct is not covered by the Technology Protection Plan.

          • Key Removal (with or without rubber stopper being intact)
            • Keys do not fall off without force being applied to them to break the parts that hold them in place. Key removal is indicative of picking at the device and removing keys. Rubber nubs under the keys are connected below the plastics and metals of each key, and do not come off without being pulled or picked at.
            • The Chromebook models after 2016 have tabs to keep keys under the bezel of the keyboard. The tabs or bezel must be pulled up for keys to come off.
            • Rubber around the device and on the bottom cover is adhered with adhesives and has notches and rubber nubs that hold it in place. These parts do not just fall off, they must be pulled or picked to separate them from the plastics they are attached to.
            • Cleaning fines will be applied for any markings on the device. If they can not be removed due to the medium used to color, draw, or writing being permanent, there will be a cost to replace those affected parts.
            • Harsh chemicals cannot be used to clean off devices as it causes further damage to the plastics.
            • Any etching or carving on a device will be considered intentional.

            Vandalism and Theft

            In cases of theft, vandalism, and other criminal acts, a police report must be filed by the student or parent as soon as possible (within 48 hours after the theft or vandalism is discovered). The police report must be presented to the building principal and a technology help desk ticket must be entered at the Medica Center. Further, students/parents must contact their building principal ASAP after the device is determined to be stolen, lost or vandalized. There is geo-location software that can be activated by the technology department once the principal is notified.

            Technical Issues/Damage/Loss

            Take your device to your school’s media center if you experience any technical problems or damage. If it cannot be fixed at that time, a loaner device may be issued to you, if available. All device policy agreements and technology protection plan will remain in effect for the loaner device.

            Audio & Sound

            The sound must be muted at all times, unless permission is obtained from the teacher for instructional purposes. Earbuds/headphones may be used in the classroom-based only upon individual teacher approval.

            Device Identification

            Student devices will be labeled in the manner specified by the district. Devices can be identified based on the serial number. Asset numbers and the PLSD logo have been etched onto the top of Chromebooks. Do not remove or cover any identifying labels or markings.

            Personalizing Devices

            Students are permitted to place school appropriate stickers on the top of their Chromebooks only. The presence of weapons, alcohol, drug or gang-related symbols or pictures are not permitted per school/district policies. Stickers cannot cover the PLSD logo or the asset tag number. Stickers are not permitted on the sides or bottom of the Chromebook. 3D stickers, puffy stickers, or rhinestone and gemstones are not permitted as they can cause damage to the device.

            Students are permitted to install school appropriate personal apps on their devices. If storage on the device becomes an issue, all school required applications have a priority over student downloads and may require the student to uninstall personal apps.

            No stickers are permitted on the iPads.

            Device Collection

            Devices must be returned to the building media center during the final weeks of the school year by the date announced each spring or prior to withdrawal from Pickerington Schools. Any student who withdraws, terminates enrollment, or is expelled, must return their device and accessories immediately. If a student fails to return the device and/or accessories the student/parent will be billed for the replacement cost of the device and/or accessory. Any device not returned or immediately paid for in full will be considered stolen property and law enforcement will be notified.

            Care of the Device

            The device is the property of Pickerington Local Schools and all users will follow these rules and the Acceptable Use Policy. Students are responsible at all times for the care of the device to which they are assigned.

            • Use a microfiber or clean soft cloth to clean your display and keyboard on a regular basis. Do not use paper towels or wet wipes.
            • If further cleaning is needed, use isopropyl alcohol wipes or a dry soft cloth only. Household cleaners or household wipes can cause damage to the device.
            • If you sneeze or cough on the device please wipe it off see the sections above about cleaning.
            • Keep all foods and liquids away from the device. Eating or drinking over the device can cause damage if liquids or food get on the device, especially the keyboard.
            • Do not leave the Chromebook in an unsecured location as this could result in the loss or theft of the device. This includes leaving the device in a car. Extreme heat or cold can also harm the device.
            • Under no circumstances should devices be left in unsupervised areas including school grounds, athletic fields/areas, cafeterias, computer labs, classrooms, dressing rooms, and hallways. Unsupervised devices will be confiscated and disciplinary action may be taken.
            • Stickers may not be placed on the trackpad, keyboard, camera, or bottom cover and may not be covering the device etchings. Stickers containing profanity, guns, violence, or drugs will be reported to building administration and promptly removed.
            • Completely power off the device at least once a month. Hold down the power button until the screen goes black and stays off. Once restarted, install any available updates.
            • Use Gopher Buddy to check for updates every couple of weeks. If it has a red exclamation point on the icon, please install the available update.
            • Students will not have the opportunity to charge their devices at school, devices are to come to school, each day, charged to 100%.
            • Too much pressure may crack the screen or cause internal damage. Avoid placing anything on top of the device or placing it in an overstuffed locker or book bag.
            • Keep all rubber, keys, serial numbers, and logos of the device intact. If removed this will be considered intentional damage.
            • Keep liquids out of your backpack when the Chromebook is in it. If the device is inside your backpack please treat your backpack with care to avoid damage to the device.
            • When walking with the Chromebook always keep the lid closed and use both hands to hold.
            • If the device is left on the floor, a chair, or sofa there could be significant damage from stepping or sitting on the device. Please keep the device off of these surfaces.
            • Drawing, writing, or etching on the device using pencil, marker, paint, nail polish, or any other implement will result in a fine for cleaning etching will result in a fine for the replacement of the damaged part.
            • When carrying the Chromebook on top of your books please be careful the device does not slide off. Place any three-ring-binders on top of the device to avoid an uneven surface.
            • Gently close the lid of the device and ensure nothing, including pencils or other objects, are in between the keyboard and display.
            • All repairs must be completed by the PLSD Technology Department. Attempting to repair the device or taking it elsewhere could result in intentional damage fines.

            Transporting Devices

            When transporting the device between classes or outside the building, you are required to close the lid. Never walk with the device open. Students are required to take their devices home every day after school, regardless of whether or not they are needed.

            Students will be required to maintain an updated password on their device. Students may never share, distribute, or otherwise allow other students access to their password. At any time, a parent, teacher, or school administrator may request and obtain the password and access to the device.

            Chromebook FAQ’s

            Q. What is a Chromebook?

            A. “Chromebooks are mobile devices designed specifically for people who live on the web. With a comfortable, full-sized keyboard, large display and clickable trackpad, all-day battery life, lightweight and built-in ability to connect to Wi-Fi and mobile broadband networks, the Chromebooks are ideal for any time, anywhere access to the web.”

            Q. What kind of software does a Chromebook run?

            A. “Chromebooks run thousands of web-based applications, or web apps, that open right in the browser. You can access web apps by typing their URL into the address bar or by installing them instantly from the Chrome Web Store.” Chromebooks are able to run Android apps starting in the summer/fall of 2016.

            Q. How are these web-based applications managed?

            A. Each Chromebook we provide to students will be a managed device. Members of the Pickerington School District Technology Department will maintain devices through our Google Apps for Education account.

            Q. Can the Chromebook be used anywhere at any time?

            A. Yes, as long as you have a WIFI signal to access the web. There is an offline option, as well, when using Google Drive, and when students enter a wi-fi connection, it syncs again with the student’s Google account.

            Q. Will our Chromebook have 3G/Cellular Signal?

            A. No. The district Chromebooks will not have 3G broadband or a cellular signal.

            Q. Is there antivirus software included with the Chromebooks?

            A. At this time, there is not as all of the data is stored in the cloud, there is no need for antivirus software. They do, however, come with web filtering.

            Q. How long will the Chromebook run on a fully charged battery?

            A. Chromebooks have a rated battery life of 8-10 hours. However, we do expect that students charge them each evening to ensure maximum performance during the school day without interruption of use.

            Technology Protection Plan for Grades K-5

            Please read this entire document to determine if this plan is needed for you and your child’s protection against the cost of damage to the loaned device (Chromebook or iPad) in your care. This plan is available for all students grades K-5 for the 2020-2021 school year (Note: For 2020-2021 school year there is a different TPP for 6th – 12th grade)

            This annual agreement covers the Chromebook or iPad (“device”) loaned to the student against any accidental damage and/or repair costs. This agreement costs $30 per device per school year for a total of $400 worth of repairs, replacement and/or labor costs. Any costs above and beyond $400 will the responsibility of the parents/guardians/student. The charger is NOT covered and is the sole responsibility of the student/parent. Coverage is 24 hours per day. Damage(s) due to intentional, reckless, willful, wanton and/or malicious conduct is not covered. Lost devices will not be covered by the technology protection plan. Stolen devices will be covered by the technology protection plan as long as the parent/guardian submits to PLSD a filed police report for the stolen device. The Technology Protection Plan will cover damage and repairs for loaner devices, but will count towards the total allowed for the TPP.

            Effective Date and Expiration

            Coverage is effective from the date this technology protection plan is purchased through Infinite Campus. Subject to immediate termination for the failure to timely pay the premium, the coverage shall end on the date that the device is required to be returned to the school, whether or not that device is returned to the school by that date. This is an annual plan.

            Premium & How to Purchase the Technology Protection Plan

            The premium cost is $30 for the 2020-21school year, for this OPTIONAL coverage, and the premium will not be prorated. This premium will be added to your child’s account at the start of the school year. Payment is due by September 25, 2020 for the plan to be in effect. Coverage will be removed for those students whose parents/guardians do not pay this premium by September 25, 2020. Payment may be made via the Infinite Campus Parent Portal, or at your child’s school.

            The Technology Protection Plan is non-refundable. Administration, in its sole discretion, will determine if damages were due to intentional, reckless, willful, wanton and/or malicious conduct (please see PLSD Technology website for more specific information). This is an annual plan, previously purchased PLSD Technology Protection Plans will NOT cover the new school year. The Technology Protection Plan is not subject to waiver for free and reduced students as it is totally an OPTIONAL fee students/parents are NOT required to have this coverage.

            Reminder this is an annual plan and does NOT extend from one school year to the next.

            Student Enrolling After the Start of the School Year: Purchasing the TPP

            If you are new to the District after September 25, 2020, log in your Infinite Campus Parent Portal and under the fees section, there is an optional purchase, Technology Protection Plan. Purchase and pay for the plan for it to be active. Reminder this is an annual plan and does NOT extend from one school year to the next.

            If the Technology Protection Plan is NOT Purchased
            All damages and replacement parts will be charged at the current market rate with a labor fine of $15-$50 determined by the repair. Damage fine without the Technology Protection Plan will range between $15 – $300. If the cost of the damage exceeds $300, then a new device will be issued at the cost of $300. All damage, replacement parts and labor costs will be applied through the parent portal in Infinite Campus. Additionally, when a student is provided a loaner device all of the regulations apply for proper care of loaner devices, any damage to the loaner device will be the responsibility of the parent/guardian/student.

            If Your Device is Damaged (if you have the Technology Protection Plan or Not)
            Take your device to the Media Center and inform the Media Center Specialist/Aide what the issue is with the device. A loaner device will be supplied during the time in which your issued device is being repaired. Loaner devices are only available to students that have submitted a damaged device to the Media Center.

            Any questions or concerns about fines need to be addressed through the Pickerington Schools Treasurer’s Office.

            Technology Protection Plan for Grades 6-12

            Please read this entire document to determine if this plan is needed for you and your child’s protection against the cost of damage to the loaned device (Chromebook or iPad) in your care. This plan is available for all students grades 6-12 for the 2020-2021 school year (Note: For 2020-2021 school year there is a different TPP for kindergarten through 5th grade)

            This annual agreement covers the Chromebook or iPad (“device”) loaned to the student against any accidental damage and/or repair costs. This agreement costs $40 per device per school year for a total of $400 worth of repairs, replacement and/or labor costs. Any costs above and beyond $400 will the responsibility of the parents/guardians/student. The charger is NOT covered and is the sole responsibility of the student/parent. Coverage is 24 hours per day. Damage(s) due to intentional, reckless, willful, wanton and/or malicious conduct is not covered. Lost devices will not be covered by the technology protection plan. Stolen devices will be covered by the technology protection plan as long as the parent/guardian submits to PLSD a filed police report for the stolen device. The Technology Protection Plan will cover damage and repairs for loaner devices, but will count towards the total allowed for the TPP.

            Effective Date and Expiration

            Coverage is effective from the date this technology protection plan is purchased through Infinite Campus. Subject to immediate termination for the failure to timely pay the premium, the coverage shall end on the date that the device is required to be returned to the school, whether or not that device is returned to the school by that date. This is an annual plan.

            Premium & How to Purchase the Technology Protection Plan

            The premium cost is $40 for the 2020-21school year, for this OPTIONAL coverage, and the premium will not be prorated. This premium will be added to your child’s account at the start of the school year. Payment is due by September 25, 2020 for the plan to be in effect. Coverage will be removed for those students whose parents/guardians do not pay this premium by September 25, 2020. Payment may be made via the Infinite Campus Parent Portal, or at your child’s school.

            The Technology Protection Plan is non-refundable. Administration, in its sole discretion, will determine if damages were due to intentional, reckless, willful, wanton and/or malicious conduct (please see PLSD Technology website for more specific information). This is an annual plan, previously purchased PLSD Technology Protection Plans will NOT cover the new school year. The Technology Protection Plan is not subject to waiver for free and reduced students as it is totally an OPTIONAL fee students/parents are NOT required to have this coverage.

            Reminder this is an annual plan and does NOT extend from one school year to the next.

            Student Enrolling After the Start of the School Year: Purchasing the TPP

            If you are new to the District after September 25, 2020, log in your Infinite Campus Parent Portal and under the fees section, there is an optional purchase, Technology Protection Plan. Purchase and pay for the plan for it to be active. Reminder this is an annual plan and does NOT extend from one school year to the next.

            If the Technology Protection Plan is NOT Purchased
            All damages and replacement parts will be charged at the current market rate with a labor fine of $15-$50 determined by the repair. Damage fine without the Technology Protection Plan will range between $15 – $300. If the cost of the damage exceeds $300, then a new device will be issued at the cost of $300. All damage, replacement parts and labor costs will be applied through the parent portal in Infinite Campus. Additionally, when a student is provided a loaner device all of the regulations apply for proper care of loaner devices, any damage to the loaner device will be the responsibility of the parent/guardian/student.

            If Your Device is Damaged (if you have the Technology Protection Plan or Not)
            Take your device to the Media Center and inform the Media Center Specialist/Aide what the issue is with the device. A loaner device will be supplied during the time in which your issued device is being repaired. Loaner devices are only available to students that have submitted a damaged device to the Media Center.

            Any questions or concerns about fines need to be addressed through the Pickerington Schools Treasurer’s Office.

            With starting a new school year the Technology Team wanted to remind you of a few things as you take your devices home .

            Please keep the things below in mind going forward.

            Care of the Device

            The device is the property of Pickerington Local Schools and all users will follow these rules and the Acceptable Use Policy. Students are responsible at all times for the care of the device to which they are assigned.

            • Use a microfiber or clean soft cloth to clean your display and keyboard on a regular basis. Do not use paper towels or wet wipes.
            • If further cleaning is needed, use isopropyl alcohol wipes or a dry soft cloth only. Household cleaners or household wipes can cause damage to the device.
            • If you sneeze or cough on the device please wipe it off see the sections above about cleaning.
            • Keep all foods and liquids away from the device. Eating or drinking over the device can cause damage if liquids or food get on the device, especially the keyboard.
            • Do not leave the Chromebook in an unsecured location as this could result in the loss or theft of the device. This includes leaving the device in a car. Extreme heat or cold can also harm the device.
            • Under no circumstances should devices be left in unsupervised areas including school grounds, athletic fields/areas, cafeterias, computer labs, classrooms, dressing rooms, and hallways. Unsupervised devices will be confiscated and disciplinary action may be taken.
            • Stickers may not be placed on the trackpad, keyboard, camera, or bottom cover and may not be covering the device etchings. Stickers containing profanity, guns, violence, or drugs will be reported to building administration and promptly removed.
            • Completely power off the device at least once a month. Hold down the power button until the screen goes black and stays off. Once restarted, install any available updates.
            • Use Gopher Buddy to check for updates every couple of weeks. If it has a red exclamation point on the icon, please install the available update.
            • Students will not have the opportunity to charge their devices at school, devices are to come to school, each day, charged to 100%.
            • Too much pressure may crack the screen or cause internal damage. Avoid placing anything on top of the device or placing it in an overstuffed locker or book bag.
            • Keep all rubber, keys, serial numbers, and logos of the device intact. If removed this will be considered intentional damage.
            • Keep liquids out of your backpack when the Chromebook is in it. If the device is inside your backpack please treat your backpack with care to avoid damage to the device.
            • When walking with the Chromebook always keep the lid closed and use both hands to hold.
            • If the device is left on the floor, a chair, or sofa there could be significant damage from stepping or sitting on the device. Please keep the device off of these surfaces.
            • Drawing, writing, or etching on the device using pencil, marker, paint, nail polish, or any other implement will result in a fine for cleaning etching will result in a fine for the replacement of the damaged part.
            • When carrying the Chromebook on top of your books please be careful the device does not slide off. Place any three-ring-binders on top of the device to avoid an uneven surface.
            • Gently close the lid of the device and ensure nothing, including pencils or other objects, are in between the keyboard and display.
            • All repairs must be completed by the PLSD Technology Department. Attempting to repair the device or taking it elsewhere could result in intentional damage fines.

            This form must be signed by a parent/guardian and the student before the One2One device will be issued – Device Agreement (PDF) | Device Agreement (RTF). Please print out a copy and bring the completed form during the device handout days.

            One device and charger (“equipment”) are being loaned to the student and are in good working order. It is the student’s and parent/guardian’s responsibility to care for the equipment and ensure that it is maintained in a safe environment. The equipment is, and at all times remains, the property of Pickerington Local School District (PLSD) and is herewith loaned to the student for educational purposes.

            Student Agreement:

            I will follow the expectations outlined in the Device Handbook and the PLSD Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) at all times.

            • I agree to immediately return the equipment in good working condition upon the District’s request or withdrawal from the school district.
            • I assume full responsibility of the issued equipment at all times
            • I acknowledge that the handbook is to be used as a guide and does not attempt to address every required or prohibited behavior by its users.
            • I understand that this equipment is the property of PLSD and PLSD has the right to search and/or monitor the equipment issued to me and the digital use on the equipment and PLSD accounts.

            Parent/Guardian Agreement:

            • I, on behalf of my minor child (student above), acknowledge and agree to all of the terms set forth about under “Student Agreement.”
            • I will be responsible for the equipment repair or replacement costs as specified in the Device Handbook and/or I will purchase the PLSD Technology Protection Plan.
            • I acknowledge that my student and I are to follow the expectations in the Device Handbook and the PLSD Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) and that a violation of these guidelines could result in the student facing disciplinary action.
            • I will be responsible for monitoring my student’s use of the Internet when he/she is not at school.
            • I agree to immediately return the equipment in good working condition upon the District’s request or withdrawal from the school district, whichever occurs first.
            • I acknowledge that the handbook is to be used as a guide and does not attempt to address every required or prohibited behavior by its users.

            If your student(s) is in grade 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, or 12 and attended PLSD during the 19-20 school year, they already have a device and will continue to use their same device during the 20-21 school year.

            All 2020 – 2021 Elementary Students

            Students/Families in grades 1-4 will be asked to drive to their home elementary school on the dates listed below and follow the student drop-off/pick-up route to the curbside pickup location (purple tent). Please let the PLSD staff member know the name, grade, and homeroom teacher of your student. They will then give you a device and power cord (1st & 2nd grade = iPads and 3rd & 4th grade = Chromebooks), as well as numerous pieces of information.

            August 20th – Grades 1-4 only – Heritage, Pickerington, Fairfield, Violet Elementary Schools from 8:30 am – 3:30 PM

            August 21st – Grades 1-4 only – Sycamore Creek, Tussing, Toll Gate Elementary from 8:30 am – 3:30 PM

            Kindergarten students will receive their device on August 31st, September 1 or 2 from their teacher during the orientation and assessment days.

            • If your elementary student will be attending the Virtual Learning Academy (VLA) they will still be issued a device and they need to pick it up at their home building (the physical building they would have attended).
            • If you cannot make it during your building’s scheduled curbside pick up, students will need to wait until their first day of school to pick up their device.
              • You cannot go to another school and please do not ask the office to pick up the device at a different time.
              • Fourth Grade Gateway students will need to bring their old Chromebook and power cord to swap it out for the new device.

              All 2020 – 2021 5th Grade Students

              Students/Families in grade 5 will be asked to drive to their middle school on August 19th from 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM and follow the student drop-off/pick-up route to the curbside pickup location (purple tent). Please let the PLSD staff member know the name and grade of your student. They will then give you a Chromebook and power cord, as well as numerous pieces of information.

              • If your middle school student will be attending the Virtual Learning Academy (VLA) they will still be issued a device and they need to pick it up at their home building (the physical building they would have attended).
                • Students attending the Gateway Academy will need to pick up their device at Toll Gate MS.
                • You cannot go to another school and please do not ask the office to pick up the device at a different time.
                • Fourth Grade Gateway students will need to bring their old Chromebook and power cord to swap it out for the new device.

                All 2020-2021 9th Grade Students

                All 9th graders will receive a new Chromebook this year. We are asking that all 9th-grade students bring their old Chromebook and power cord into the school on the following dates and we will swap them to a new Chromebook (you must bring in your old Chromebook and power cord to get a new one). Chromebooks will be swapped out in English classes.

                • Cohort A – PHSN – Monday, August 31st
                • Cohort A – PHSC – Tuesday, September 1st
                • Cohort B – PHSN – Thursday, September 3rd
                • Cohort B – PHSC – Friday, September 4th

                9th Grade students that will be attending the Virtual Learning Academy are asked to bring their old Chromebook and power cord to the curbside pickup at Diley Middle School on August 21st from 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM to swap it out for a new device. You must bring your old Chromebook and power cord to receive a new device.

                Students in Grades 6-12 that are New to Pickerington Schools since the end of the 19-20 School Year

                Students/Families in grade 6-12 who are brand new to Pickerington Schools since the end of the 2019-2020 school year will be asked to drive to Diley Middle School on August 21st from 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM and follow the student drop-off/pick-up route to the curbside pickup location (purple tent). Please let the PLSD staff member know the name and grade of your student. They will then give you a Chromebook and power cord, as well as numerous pieces of information.

                • If your new student will be attending the Virtual Learning Academy (VLA) they will still be issued a device and they need to pick it up at Diley Middle School on August 21st from 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM

                All PLSD students are issued a Google account. Their email/account is their first name_last name and the last three digits of their student ID# @students.plsd.us (example: [email protected] ). The password for students in grades K-5 will be their student ID#+00 (example: 80212300). Students in grade 5 will need to create a new unique password (with at least one capital letter, one lowercase letter, one number and one unique symbol). Students in grades 6-12 should continue to use the same password as they did last year.

                If your Google Password does not work and you would like the technology team to reset it, please fill out the following form including an email of a parent or guardian. The technology team will reset it and will email a parent/guardian your new temporary password.

                For the iPads, students do not have a direct password, but at some point in time we will require that all students with an iPad create a passcode (more information about that coming later).

                We will continue to use Classlink as our main platform for all digital content and software. Students can log in using their Google account information and for students in K-4 we will provide their Classlink Quickcard to use as well. Also, later this year, we will launch the ability to login with Classlink with facial recognition (students will be shown this option later in the school year).

                If the device is still in good working condition, then there is nothing that you need to do and students will need to continue to bring the device to school, charged, every day.

                If your current device is damaged to the point of not working, we will be holding technology repair days.

                In order to receive service, please sign up at the below link so we can prepare for the correct number of visits.

                Technology Repair Days will be held in the Heritage Elementary Auditorium (90 N East Street) on the following days for January 2021. Please enter through the front doors to the Heritage Elementary Auditorium. Masks are required.

                If the district returns to Status Level Green in the Flexible Learning 2.0 Plan at any point during the year, we will eliminate these service days.


                SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

                Fig. S1. Area type map on SF-CHAMP links.

                Table S1. Fixed-effects panel model estimation results only accounting for background traffic.

                Table S2. Network performance metrics by TOD.

                Table S3. Network performance metrics by area type.

                Table S4. Network performance metrics by facility type.

                Data S1. Supporting data for Fig. 1.

                Data S2. Supporting data for Fig. 2.

                Data S3. Model estimation files.

                Data S4. Model application results and supporting data for Fig. 3.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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