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Using ArcGIS Desktop with SQL Server Spatial as backend?


I'm wondering how best to use ArcGIS Desktop and SQL Server 2008 together. At the moment we run manual imports and exports between sql 2008 and arcgis 10 shape files. With sql 2008 having a geography data type I was expecting it to be simple to replace to the map files with a relational database, but for some reason it doesn't seem as simple as I expected.

Has anyone got any ideas how I can use sql 2008 for data storage and do away with shape files? I've read about arcsde, but really don't understand the point of another layer. No idea what it's actually supposed to do.


Using ArcSDE you can store spatial data in basically 2 formats. Either using the SDE native format (which is a BLOB), OR depending on the database you use (SQL Server, Oracle, PostGIS, i think DB2 spatial as well) in the respective database native format. Which for Oracle for example, is the SDO_GEOMETRY type and for SQL Server the Geography or Geometry spatial types.

Which format you actually end up using is up to you and and it wouldn't/shouldn't make any (huge) difference on the client side. Any ESRI client (e.g. Arcmap) would handle the data in the same way. My suggestion would be to go for the SQL Server native format (or Oracle's if you were using it) as otherwise I think you would have to use ESRI-only tools to do even the simplest spatial queries or analysis. Using the native db format on the other hand would allow you to query the data from other clients as well and even from SQL Server Management Studio. And as @Blomster says you can move a lot of the spatial logic into stored procedures.

As first step to import shapefiles into SQL Server would be to download the extremeley handy Shape2SQL utility by Morten Nielsen


Since you've tagged the question for ArcGIS 10, check out Query Layers: http://help.arcgis.com/en/arcgisdesktop/10.0/help/index.html#/What_is_a_query_layer/00s50000000n000000/

I've used it to connect to non-ArcSDE SQL Server 2008 databases.

You get to it from the file menu:

And there is a couple of other screens that walk you through defining what ArcMap needs to know to make the query layer.


(Be sure that your query includes a geometry field and a unique id field)

You'll want to test it out, since I know it was buggy at release and SP1.


In my experience, adding a SQL spatial column type has allowed me to move a lot of my spatial operations (distance, buffer) into stored procedures which is really handy.

ArcGIS toolbox has a "Copy Features" tool to push data into a sde geodatabase, and if you specify a Configuration Keyword of "Geometry" or "Geography" a sql spatial column should be generated.


ArcSDE allows you to store spatial data in the SQL Server instance, by effectively adding a spatial column to your tables; it doesn't change it, or affect existing connectivity/ applications. ArcSDE acts, if you like, as a metadata store for your spatial data, like it's featureclass name, owner, extent, type of geometry you're storing, etc, etc (all in metadata tables built on installing ArcSDE). It allows you to store anything you like, images etc, and still have spatial references (in SQL Server, if I remember correctly, spatial data is stored as tpe image?). ArcSDE manages the storage of this data. It's actually a good tool and all this from a sceptical ESRI user.

I am currently using ArcGIS Server, with ArcSDE and direct connect (using tnsnames) on an Oracle 11g back end and it's grand. I don't understand why you'd use SQL Server for spatial data when I think it is still quite immature.


You can edit vector data stored in SQL 2008 or 2012 in ArcGIS by installing the GISquirrel extension, available from www.gisquirrel.com This also provides tools to import spatial data into SQL Server from any data source that can be viewed as a layer in ArcMap. I have recently imported a table with 90 million polygons - it took 4 days, but worked without a hitch on a 2 year old laptop!


Using ArcGIS Desktop with SQL Server Spatial as backend? - Geographic Information Systems

Microsoft selected Esri to demonstrate the spatial data storage functionality of SQL Server 2008 at its premier launch event on February 27, 2008. Esri was the only business partner invited to show the integration of spatial support with Microsoft presenters. This support is the result of a close multiyear collaboration between Esri and Microsoft in the development of SQL spatial extensions to SQL Server 2008.

During the Microsoft event, Esri's California regional office manager Nate Johnson demonstrated ArcGIS Desktop software working in concert with Microsoft SQL Server 2008 to perform business site selection analysis. Johnson performed a variety of analytical functions using ArcGIS Desktop and consumed spatial data from SQL Server 2008 integrated with ArcSDE technology in ArcGIS Server Enterprise (Advanced, Standard, and Basic editions). "The goal of the collaboration was to provide a robust and secure data management platform that also delivers geospatial intelligence where users need it," says Johnson. "The demonstration was meant to show how easy it is to conduct detailed analyses from ArcGIS Desktop using the spatial features in SQL Server."

SQL Server 2008 introduces two new spatial data types: geography and geometry. All editions of ArcGIS Server Enterprise 9.3 will support these new spatial types for vector geometry storage in the enterprise geodatabase. Combined with Esri's geodata management framework, the two new spatial types in SQL Server 2008 enable users to take advantage of the geodatabase data model and directly access spatial data with native SQL functionality in the DBMS for integration with other enterprise applications.

Esri offers a complete suite of geospatial software solutions that can benefit from the powerful data management capabilities of SQL Server. ArcGIS Business Analyst Server, for example, gives users the ability to centrally manage and maintain their projects and workspaces. Also, now that SQL Server 2008 supports the storage of two new spatial types natively in ArcGIS Server Enterprise, ArcGIS Business Analyst Server can be better integrated with enterprise business systems.

"Esri is taking full advantage of SQL Server 2008 to help our government, utilities, and commercial enterprise customers take the geographic approach to improving their business processes," says Esri president Jack Dangermond. "Esri and Microsoft together provide the platform to organize and manage geographic information, leading to improved methods for analyzing and using information more effectively to make better decisions."

The next scheduled release of ArcGIS Server Enterprise will leverage the new spatial technology in the upcoming release of SQL Server 2008. Esri will continue to participate in Microsoft SQL Server 2008 launch events throughout the United States.


Using the Microsoft spatial types

ArcSDE geodatabases support storing vector data using Microsoft's geometry and geography types. These types are available in SQL Server 2008 and do not require a separate installation to use.

The Microsoft geometry type is similar to existing GIS spatial data types: it uses coordinates in an arbitrary plane, such as defined projections.

The Microsoft geography type is used for data on a spheroid that is stored with latitude and longitude coordinates.

The two types differ in the way that they make spatial calculations. For more information on Microsoft's spatial types, consult the SQL Server 2008 documentation.


How do ArcSDE geodatabases use Microsoft's spatial types?

By default, ArcSDE geodatabases in SQL Server use the ArcSDE compressed binary type, so if you want to use the Microsoft geometry or geography types for storage, you must either change the GEOMETRY_STORAGE parameter under the DEFAULTS configuration keyword in the SDE_dbtune table to GEOMETRY or GEOGRAPHY, or specify a configuration keyword that designates a GEOMETRY_STORAGE of GEOMETRY or GEOGRAPHY when creating feature classes. You should only alter the GEOMETRY_STORAGE parameter under the DEFAULTS keyword if the majority of your users will use geometry or geography for their data the majority of the time. If only some of your data will be stored in the geometry or geography type, designate a separate keyword when the feature class is created. Two keywords are provided for you, GEOMETRY and GEOGRAPHY, or you can create your own custom keywords.

Be aware that if you create a topology, network, or terrain that includes feature classes that are using geometry or geography storage, you must designate a configuration keyword when creating the topology, network, or terrain that uses the same storage type. Configuration keywords are included in the SDE_dbutne table for you to use. They are as follows:


Using existing geography or geometry tables

If you have created tables containing Microsoft geometry or geography columns using a third-party application or SQL, you can register these tables with ArcSDE and the geodatabase to take advantage of geodatabase functionality. To do so, the tables must meet certain prerequisites:

  • It must be owned by the user registering the table.
  • It must have a single spatial column of either geometry or geography.
  • All shapes in the column must have the same type of geometry (points, lines, or polygons), although the geometry can be multipart (for example, multipoint, multistring, or multipolygon).

NOTE: Adding shapes of a different type to the column using SQL after registering the layer with ArcSDE is also not supported and will result in unpredictable behavior of the feature class.

To register the table with ArcSDE, use the sdelayer command with the register operation.

The following is an example of registering a table called spdata containing polygon geometries (–e a) in a geometry column called features. The table has an integer column called fid that will be used as a unique feature identifier column, the values for which will be maintained by ArcSDE (–C fid,SDE). The spatial reference ID (SRID) used to register the layer is 5 (–R 5). This is the SRID in the SDE_spatial_references table.

If the spatial reference you need does not exist in the SDE_spatial_references table, you can create a template feature class in ArcCatalog that uses the spatial reference you want, then query the SDE_spatial_references table to see what SRID was assigned to it.

For an sde schema geodatabase

For a dbo schema geodatabase

Find the spatial reference you added with the template feature class and identify the SRID number. You could then use that number with the –R option when registering other tables that have geometry columns and are in the same coordinate reference system.

You could also specify a projection ID with the –G option instead of using the –R option. When registering tables with a geography column, the projection ID used must match one of the SRIDs stored in the SQL Server sys.spatial_references_systems table.

For tables with either type of spatial data storage that contain a large number of records, registration may take less time if you register the row ID column as user maintained.

Be aware that if you register the feature identifier column as user maintained and subsequently register the feature class with the geodatabase, ArcGIS will add an additional feature identifier column, object_ID. ArcGIS will maintain the values of this column. If the table contains a large number of records, adding this additional object_ID column may take some time.

Executing sdelayer –o register registers your table with ArcSDE, making it a feature class. This adds a record to the SDE_layers, SDE_geometry_columns, SDE_column_registry, and SDE_table_registry system tables in the geodatabase. It does not create a spatial index. You can use SQL to create spatial indexes on tables created outside ArcGIS, then register the tables with ArcSDE. Alternatively, you can create the spatial index after registering the table with ArcSDE using the sdelayer –o load_only_io and normal_io operations. Or if you subsequently register the layer with the geodatabase, you can create a spatial index using ArcCatalog. When you use sdelayer or ArcCatalog to create the spatial index, the spatial index will be created using the spatial index parameters specified in the SDE_dbtune table and the current extent of the data in the layer.

For further information on using the sdelayer command, consult the ArcSDE Administration Command Reference provided with the ArcSDE component of ArcGIS Server Enterprise.

If you need the feature class to participate in geodatabase functionality (such as relationship classes, topology, geometric networks, cadastral fabrics, terrains, schemas) or have subtypes, default values, domains, or validation rules, it must also be registered with the geodatabase.

Registering the feature class with the geodatabase adds a record to the GDB_OBJECTCLASSES and GDB_FEATURECLASSES system tables.

You can register the datasets in ArcCatalog as follows:

  1. Start ArcCatalog.
  2. Right-click the feature class you want to register with the geodatabase.
  3. Click Register with Geodatabase.

SQL Server's prerequisite for creating a spatial index is that the table must have a clustered primary key on it.

For spatial tables created outside ArcGIS (for example, those created using SQL), you must create a clustered primary key on the table and create a spatial index using SQL. The following is the SQL syntax for creating a spatial index on a table that contains a geometry or geography type column:

When creating a layer with a geometry or geography spatial column through ArcGIS, the bounding box of the feature class is calculated as the extent of the data that is to be indexed. Any features falling outside this range will not be indexed but will still be returned in spatial queries. If the layer extent is not set, the maximum range of coordinates for the layer's spatial reference system will be used for the bounding box. Whenever the layer is switched from load only I/O mode to normal I/O mode, the bounding box is adjusted with the latest layer extent.

Additionally, when you create a feature class with a geometry or geography column using ArcGIS, ArcSDE creates a clustered primary key on the row id column of the business table, then builds a spatial index based on the values set for the B_MS_SPINDEX parameter of the configuration keyword in the SDE_dbtune table used when the feature class was created. When the feature class is registered as versioned, a clustered primary key is created on the row id and state id columns of the Adds table, and the spatial index is built based on the values set for the A_MS_SPINDEX in the configuration keyword used when the feature class was created. The default value for both of these parameters is as follows:

See the Spatial Indexing Overview in the Microsoft SQL Server TechCenter for more information on SQL Server spatial indexes.


Known limits of using SQL Server geography with an ArcSDE geodatabase


Using Microsoft spatial types with ArcGIS

Use configuration keywords to specify Microsoft spatial types

By default, geodatabases in SQL Server use the Microsoft geometry type. If you want to use the Microsoft geography type for storage in geodatabases in on-premises SQL Server databases, you must either (1) change the GEOMETRY_STORAGE parameter under the DEFAULTS configuration keyword in the SDE_dbtune table to GEOGRAPHY, or (2) specify a configuration keyword that designates a GEOMETRY_STORAGE parameter of GEOGRAPHY when creating feature classes.

You should only alter the GEOMETRY_STORAGE parameter under the DEFAULTS keyword if the majority of your users will use geography for their data most of the time. If only some of your data will be stored in the geography type, designate a separate keyword when the feature class is created. A keyword is provided for you—GEOGRAPHY—or you can create your own custom keyword.

Use the sdedbtune administration command to alter the values in the SDE_dbtune table. This command can be installed using the ArcSDE Application Server for SQL Server installation.

When creating feature classes in SQL Server databases, choose either the geometry or geography keyword.

Registering an existing spatial table with the geodatabase

If you used a third-party application or SQL to create tables that contain Microsoft spatial type columns in your geodatabase, you can register these tables with the geodatabase to take advantage of geodatabase functionality such as relationship classes, topology, geometric networks, cadastral fabrics, terrains, or schemas, or have subtypes, default values, domains, or validation rules. To do so, the tables must meet certain prerequisites:

  • The table must be owned by the user who is registering it.
  • The table must have a single spatial column of either geometry or geography type.
  • All shapes in the column must be the same spatial type, either points, lines, polygons, multipoints, multistrings, or multipolygons.

Adding shapes of a different type to the column using SQL after registering the table with the geodatabase is also not supported and will result in unpredictable behavior of the feature class.

See Registering a table with the geodatabase for instructions on how to register the table with the geodatabase from ArcGIS for Desktop .

Enabling a geodatabase in an existing database does not automatically register existing tables with the geodatabase. Any tables or feature classes that you want to participate in the geodatabase must be registered with the geodatabase separately.

Creating a spatial index

SQL Server requires that the table have a primary key to be able to create a spatial index on it.

In ArcGIS

When you create a feature class with a geometry or geography column in a geodatabase using ArcGIS, by default, ArcGIS creates a clustered primary key on the row id (ObjectID) column of the business table then builds a spatial index based on the values set for the B_MS_SPINDEX parameter of the configuration keyword in the SDE_dbtune table used when the feature class was created. When the feature class is registered as versioned, a clustered primary key is created on the row id and state id columns of the Adds table, and the spatial index is built based on the values set for the A_MS_SPINDEX in the configuration keyword used when the feature class was created. The default value for both of these parameters is as follows:

See Altering the contents of the DBTUNE table for information on setting values in the SDE_dbtune table.

When creating a feature class with a geometry or geography spatial column in a database or geodatabase through ArcGIS, the bounding box of the feature class is calculated as the extent of the data to be indexed. Any features falling outside this range will not be indexed but will still be returned in spatial queries. If the feature class extent is not set, the maximum range of coordinates for the feature class's spatial reference system will be used for the bounding box. You can set or recalculate a feature class's extent from the Feature Extent tab of the Feature Class Properties dialog box. If the feature class is in a geodatabase, the bounding box is adjusted with the latest extent whenever the layer is switched from load-only I/O mode to normal I/O mode.

Outside ArcGIS

For spatial tables created outside ArcGIS—for example, those created using SQL—you must create a primary key on the table and create a spatial index using SQL. The following is the SQL syntax for creating a spatial index on a table that contains a geometry type column:

The following syntax creates a spatial index on a geography column:

Known limits of using SQL Server geography with ArcGIS

The following is a list of things to keep in mind when storing SQL Server geography data in your enterprise geodatabase:

    ArcGIS cannot store z- or m-values in the geography data type at this release. Therefore, when you bring existing data into the geodatabase, such as a shapefile or a feature class from another geodatabase, and it must be stored using the geography data type, the incoming dataset cannot have 3D (z) or measure (m) attributes.

The z and m attributes must be disabled before the data can be imported. Alternatively, data with 3D or measure attributes can be imported into feature classes that use geometry or the compressed binary storage type.


Spatial references

Spatial references include a coordinate system for x-, y-, and z-values. In enterprise geodatabases, the spatial reference also includes tolerance and resolution values. All this information together helps indicate where on the earth the shapes on your flat map represent.

Each spatial reference also has an identifier (often called a well-known ID, spatial reference ID, or SRID) and a well-known text definition of the coordinate system. There are certain standard IDs, such as those defined by the European Petroleum Survey Group (EPSG) or Esri, but the ID for spatial references is not always standard. This has implications when moving your spatial data between databases. See the section "How the spatial reference system is used in ArcGIS" in this topic for more information.

When created through ArcGIS, a spatial reference system with a specific SRID is assigned to the feature class. If a spatial reference is not assigned, the feature class has an unknown spatial reference. This spatial reference and SRID apply to all rows in the feature class.

When spatial tables are created directly in the database (outside of ArcGIS), each record in a spatial table can be assigned a different SRID and spatial reference. However, when you use these database tables with ArcGIS, ArcGIS only recognizes one SRID and spatial reference for the whole table. You can define a query layer to specify which SRID will be used, and all rows with that SRID will be accessible in ArcGIS. Otherwise, ArcGIS reads the SRID of the first row in the table, and only rows that have that SRID defined will be accessible in ArcGIS.


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Move data between the SQL Server Spatial model and:

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Microsoft SQL Server is a database solution with the primary function of storing and retrieving data as requested by other applications. SQL Server Spatial functionality extends its capabilities to allow for geometry and geography spatial data types.


Esri ArcGIS 10.4.1 for Server with SQL Express (Oct 2020)

Note: Always ensure your operating system is current for your needs.

This product includes both of the software packages described below:

Esri ArcGIS 10.4.1 for Server with SQL Express (Oct 2020)

ArcGIS for Server allows maps and geographic information to be accessed anywhere, anytime, on any device. This includes web browsers, smartphones, tablets, and desktop applications.

Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Express on Windows Server 2012 R2

"The SQL Server Amazon Machine Images (AMI) is built, updated, and fully-patched by AWS within five business days of Microsoft's patch Tuesday (the second Tuesday of each month). Launching an instance from this AMI enables you to run the instance as a database server and saves you the effort to install SQL Server software. This AMI comes with following software and drivers including AWS Systems Manager, AWS CloudFormation, AWS Tools for Windows PowerShell, Network drivers, and Storage drivers.

You can use AWS Launch Wizard to easily size, configure, and deployment SQL Server applications on AWS. Launch Wizard for SQL Server supports both single instance and high availability deployments according to AWS and SQL Server best practices."


ArcGIS 10.2.1 for (Desktop, Engine, Server) Utilities and Telecom Update 2 Patch

This patch is the second in a series of updates targeting utility and telecom workflows, though it can be beneficial to all users of ArcGIS 10.2.1. The patch targets a number of issues related to the use of schematic diagrams, and also corrects issues with the st_geometry storage type, memory allocation, spatial indexes, performance, and more.

  • Introduction
  • Issues Addressed with this patch
  • Installing this patch on Windows
  • Installing this patch on Linux
  • Upgrade a geodatabase
  • Patch Updates
  • How to identify which ArcGIS products are installed
  • Getting Help

Important Note

March 9, 2015: The ArcGIS for Server on Windows setup is available as a "B" version for download. The ArcGIS for Server Linux setup will not be updated. Users of ArcGIS for Server Linux must install the 10.2.1 version of the ArcGIS for Server Security (January 2015) Patch prior to installing this patch to avoid any installation conflicts.

Introduction

Esri® announces the ArcGIS 10.2.1 for (Desktop, Engine, Server) Utilities and Telecom Update 2 Patch. This patch is the second in a series of updates targeting utility and telecom workflows, though it can be beneficial to all users of ArcGIS 10.2.1. The patch targets a number of issues related to the use of schematic diagrams, and also corrects issues with the st_geometry storage type, memory allocation, spatial indexes, performance, and more. This patch deals specifically with the issues listed below under Issues Addressed with this Patch.

Issues Addressed with this patch

  • BUG-000081231 - After disconnecting and connecting linear source features from a geometric network and updating the associated schematic diagram, a new schematic ID is generated for that feature and the vertices are removed.
  • BUG-000082028 - Standard editing workflows consume increasing amounts of memory and do not release it after editing has stopped.
  • BUG-000082630 - Versioned Difference Cursor single branch edits invert the "type" of change reported (e.g., Deletes become Inserts, Inserts become Deletes).
  • NIM088321 - User defined spatial index grids are not honored by ArcGIS when using the Add Spatial Index tool, even though the tool runs successfully.
  • NIM096460 - After dropping and rebuilding the geometric network and updating a schematic diagram containing schematic rules, network junction locations are not preserved.
  • NIM097184 - Creating a checkout in a 9.3.1 geodatabase fails with 10.2.1 Desktop.
  • NIM097983 - Optimize the opening of map documents by augmenting the geodatabase schema cache to include properties of the sde metadata.
  • NIM098475 - Spatial indexes are not created when creating a feature class on an ArcSDE 10 database from an ArcGIS Desktop 10.2 client.
  • NIM098196 - Exporting SDE schema using Oracle expdp generates ora-39127, ora-20098 and ora-06512 error about the spatial index created on GDB_items table having the st_grids parameter as commas when Oracle 11gR2 is used.
  • NIM098665 - Making a connection to a non-spatial Oracle database using either a Spatial Database Connection or an OLE Database Connection takes a significantly long time when there is a large amount of objects in the database.
  • NIM099484 - Provide a mechanism to enable instrumentation of memory usage when creating a feature cache in desktop.
  • NIM096111 - Rotating a point after a specific selection workflow on a geometric network rotates and shifts the entire geometric network.
  • NIM100182 - Bad SCHEMATICTID when diagrams get exported. Schematic features associated with GIS features which are not part of the geometric network are exported with "-2" at the end of their SCHEMATICTID.
  • NIM100823 - Rebuild the spatial index on a versioned feature class fails with an SRID mismatch error.
  • NIM100941 - Improve the Performance and Scalability of Creating and Syncing replicas by more efficiently caching database information.
  • NIM101461 - When feature classes with different SRIDs are used in an ST_intersection query, it fails with 'ORA-06530: Reference to uninitialized composite'.
  • NIM101468 - Unable to hide standalone tables using the IWorkspaceExtension.DataDictionaryTableNames method in ArcGIS 10.1 and above.
  • NIM101270 - Recalculating the feature extent on specific datasets returns the following error: "Failed to recalculate extent. The specified coordinate exceeds the valid coordinate range."
  • NIM101376 - ArcGIS for Desktop fails to save the connectivity rules for a specific geometric network.
  • NIM101746 - The Alter Field online help documentation page indicates that the Alter Field tool is available at all license levels however, the tool is unavailable at lower license levels.
  • NIM102077 - ArcGIS reports that an Oracle SDELOB or WKB feature class created in a pre-10.1 geodatabase does not have a spatial index when it does exist.
  • NIM102230 - Do not return the Documentation field on joined queries for Geodatabase internal metadata.
  • NIM102846 - When exporting diagrams into another schematic dataset using the Export Schematic Dataset process configured with GUIDs reattachment, the process expects GUIDs for each feature they contain. This is blocking when GUIDs are only missing for a feature class, in particular when this is missing for _Junctions.
  • NIM102848 - Creating a spatial index will pass values gathered from existing enterprise feature classes that may be invalid instead of passing correct values.
  • NIM102883 - When using a newer client (10.1+) against an older SQL server geodatabase (pre-10.1) through an application server connection, creation of a spatial index will fail on GEOMETRY or GEOGRAPHY feature classes with 'This SDE server does not support this client or operation'.
  • NIM102895 - Data exported via a XML workspace does not retain any 4-byte (or greater) characters in the data's attribute table.
  • NIM102996 - After dropping a spatial index on a binary feature class through an application server connection to a pre-10.1 geodatabase in SQL Server, ArcGIS is unable to determine the index is gone.
  • NIM103593 - File Geodatabase lock files should be opened as Read, rather than as Read/Write. This improves feature class/table creation performance.
  • NIM103683 - When script/query/constant attributes are configured on a schematic feature class for which the schematic features are not initialized, the attributes are not updated.
  • NIM103708 - Filter the AUDSYS, OJVMSYS, GSMADMIN_INTERNAL, DVSYS Oracle objects from connection in ArcGIS.
  • NIM103781 - The network index DESC query must only fetch the necessary attributes and not SELECT * when obtaining the USERID or ELEMENT mappings.
  • NIM104247 - Implement two new API functions for se_enable_schema_chache and se_disable_schema_cache.
  • NIM104317 - When fetching a network dataset index page, only fetch the pageblob.
  • NIM104321 - MDXT_xxx$% tables show up in ArcCatalog, connected to a 11.2.0.4 or 12.1.0.1 instance, and some are not deleted even when the feature class is deleted.

  • NIM086295- On Oracle ST_OrderingEquals is always returning the same value as ST_Equals.
  • NIM088921 - Importing an SDE schema dump fails with ORA-39083 and ORA-02309 on SDE.st_type_export.validate_spref using datapump impdp.
  • NIM089510 - Inconsistent results with st_astext_f query on polygons with more than 292 vertices.
  • NIM090071 - Labeling features based on join table's field throws 'ArcMap drawing errors' when the table and feature class are stored in different DBMS.
  • NIM094291 - The extent of data created in MicroStation DGN files is not correctly calculated in ArcMap 10.2 which causes the data to be displayed in the wrong location.
  • NIM094556 - Results from the Trace Geometric Network geoprocessing tool to trace connected are not consistent with the trace results from the Find Connected tool in the Utility Network Analyst toolbar.
  • NIM095455 - In an edit session, snapping stops working on a layer if a join exists on that layer.
  • NIM096135 - Provide option to create user schema geodatabases by a user other than SYS.
  • NIM096817 - Loading a large amount of coordinates via ST_Geometry function results in ORA-20004 and ORA-20000 errors.
  • NIM097346 - Extproc not initialized when a ST_Intersects query involving a versioned view and a base table is the first query run in the session.
  • NIM099098 - ST_ASTEXT Function is failing when the result set contains more than one record, and when the NUMPOINTS is

Installing this patch on Windows

Installation Notes:

System Administrators: A technical paper is available that discusses the enterprise deployment of ArcGIS 10.2.1 setups using Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS), System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), and Group Policy, including additional system requirements, suggestions, known issues, and Microsoft Software Installation (MSI) command line parameters. Deployment in a lockdown environment is also covered. ArcGIS 10.2.1 Enterprise Deployment.

Installation Steps:

ArcGIS 10.2.1 for Desktop, Engine, or Server must be installed before installing this patch.

    Download the appropriate file to a location other than your ArcGIS installation location.

NOTE: If double clicking on the MSP file does not start the setup installation, you can start the setup installation manually by using the following command:

Installing this patch on Linux

Installation Steps:

Complete the following install steps as the ArcGIS Install owner. The Install owner is the owner of the arcgis folder.

ArcGIS 10.2.1 for Engine or Server must be installed before installing this patch.

    Download the appropriate file to a location other than your ArcGIS installation location.

Checksum (Md5)
ArcGIS Engine ArcGIS-1021-E-UTU2-Patch-lx.tar 631899446347DBDCFFC6658F486F0D6F
ArcGIS for Server ArcGIS-1021-S-UTU2-Patch-lx.tar 2BB2B5EF330AEEA9D632B779B002C750

Upgrade a geodatabase

A geodatabase upgrade is required after applying this patch. To upgrade the geodatabase, follow the instructions in the help section specific to your database management system:

Patch Updates

Check the Patches and Service Packs page periodically for the availability of additional patches. New information about this patch will be posted here.

March 4, 2015: ArcGIS 10.2.1 for (Desktop, Engine, Server) Utilities and Telecom Update 2 Patch, ArcGIS for Server setups on Windows and Linux, are temporarily unavailable due to an issue reported registered datastores after installing the patch.

March 9, 2015: The ArcGIS for Server on Windows setup is available as a "B" version for download. The ArcGIS for Server Linux setup will not be updated. Users of ArcGIS for Server Linux must install the 10.2.1 version of the ArcGIS for Server Security (January 2015) Patch prior to installing this patch to avoid conflicts.

How to identify which ArcGIS products are installed

To determine which ArcGIS products are installed, choose the appropriate version of the PatchFinder utility for your environment and run it from your local machine. PatchFinder will list all products, hot fixes, and patches installed on your local machine.

Getting Help

Domestic sites, please contact Esri Technical Support at 1-888-377-4575, if you have any difficulty installing this patch. International sites, please contact your local Esri software distributor.


Spatial Databases

A geodatabase is a native Esri ArcGIS data format for storing geographic data. It is a collection of geographic datasets of various types and managed in either a file folder structure or a relational database, such as:

• Feature classes of points, lines, polygons and annotation for discrete features

• Feature datasets (group of feature classes)

• Descriptive attributes stored in tables

• Raster datasets and raster catalogs for imagery

MAPublisher can import several types of Esri geodatabases:

MAPublisher Import access

Microsoft Access (Jet Engine)

No RDBMS - uses local file structure

ArcSDE Desktop geodatabase

ArcSDE Workgroup geodatabase

ArcSDE Enterprise geodatabase

MAPublisher has the capacity to import all types of geodatabases (categorized as Personal, File and ArcSDE geodatabases). The connection to an ArcSDE server requires server access, user account and versioning information to be provided by the database administrator. These parameters are exactly the same required to establish a connection using Esri ArcCatalog—with a small exception for SQL Server Express connections, explained later on in this section.

Once imported into Adobe Illustrator, data does not maintain a link with the original database and database functions are not valid (topology, table/feature class relationships, subtypes and attributes domains rules). However, MAPublisher can make use of the geodatabases spatial and non-spatial relationships, subtypes and attribute domains information during the import process (to populate layer names and attributes).

Esri ArcGIS 9.x or newer must be installed and licensed to be able to fully import Esri geodatabases or to fully access an ArcSDE server (up to ArcGIS 10.0 only) using MAPublisher Import and Multiple Data Import. At minimum, an ArcGIS Engine Runtime must be installed. More commonly, higher licenses that may be used are ArcView, ArcEditor and ArcInfo.

Only 32-bit applications can use the Esri ArcSDE geodatabase connection. Direct access to feature classes on an ArcSDE Server requires, at minimum, ArcReader (available for free). However, File and Personal geodatabases cannot be read using ArcReader. With this license configuration, access to files with a Basic Esri ArcSDE Server connection is limited compared to a Esri ArcSDE Geodatabase connections (explained further in this section). MAPublisher supports all ArcSDE server connections and SQL queries supported by Esri.

The MAPublisher Basic Personal Geodatabase Reader and Basic File Geodatabase Reader does not require an ArcGIS licenses for Windows and is compatible with Mac. However, this means that some import functions are limited in use (explained further in this section).

MAPublisher supports ArcGIS 9.2 and newer geodatabases. However, there are some limitations to the direct connections from 9.2 clients to the ArcSDE 9.3 geodatabases. Please refer to Esri documentation on software requirements (service packs) and limitations.

To use ArcGIS 10.0 geodatabases with MAPublisher, a licensed installation of ArcGIS 10.0 is required. Having a valid installation allows for backwards compatibility with geodatabases created by ArcGIS 9.2 and newer.

If ArcReader is not installed on the default installation directory, it might be necessary to edit the binary location in the MAPublisher Preferences, Basic Esri ArcSDE Server Editor.

Unicode characters in path names are not supported by the Basic Personal and File Geodatabase Readers.

The following is a list of supported and unsupported geodatabase geometry types for import in MAPublisher:


Looking Under the Hood of a SQL Server Geodatabase

Let's take a look at how the data we've been working with in ArcGIS Pro is stored in SQL Server.

  1. If you need to, log in to your enterprise geodatabase instance using Windows Remote Desktop.
  2. If you are still in the remote connection used for the earlier parts of the lesson, close ArcGIS Pro and open SQL Server Management Studio.
  3. Connect to the localhost server, and browse inside the egdb database (Databases > egdb).
  4. Expand the Tables folder, and note that all of the tables we've worked with in the last couple of lessons are found here (along with many others, some of which we'll discuss momentarily).
  5. Open the jb.CITIES table (right-click > Select Top 1000 Rows). Under the Results tab, you should see all of the attribute data along with a SHAPE column. Keep in mind that the values in the shape column are in Microsoft geometry format. You could work with your data using raw SQL much like we did with PostGIS by taking advantage of SQL Server's spatial data tools [https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/spatial/spatial-data-sql-server].
  6. Close the CITIES table.
    But in the Object Explorer pane, keep the list of Tables expanded.

B. Repository tables

ArcSDE relies on a number of tables behind the scenes. Many of these so-called repository tables are owned by the dbo superuser.

    Looking at the Tables listing, you should see a few "GDB_*" tables and many "SDE_*" tables. It's not important for you to know the purpose of all of these tables, but there are a few that are worth discussing.

It's not really important that you remember much about these repository tables. However, hopefully you now have a bit of an appreciation for what's going on behind the scenes and will see the tables as a bit less of a mystery.

Always remember to Stop your Instance when you finish or when you take a long break.


ArcGIS 10.2.1 for (Desktop, Engine, Server) Utilities and Telecom Update 2 Patch

This patch is the second in a series of updates targeting utility and telecom workflows, though it can be beneficial to all users of ArcGIS 10.2.1. The patch targets a number of issues related to the use of schematic diagrams, and also corrects issues with the st_geometry storage type, memory allocation, spatial indexes, performance, and more.

  • Introduction
  • Issues Addressed with this patch
  • Installing this patch on Windows
  • Installing this patch on Linux
  • Upgrade a geodatabase
  • Patch Updates
  • How to identify which ArcGIS products are installed
  • Getting Help

Important Note

March 9, 2015: The ArcGIS for Server on Windows setup is available as a "B" version for download. The ArcGIS for Server Linux setup will not be updated. Users of ArcGIS for Server Linux must install the 10.2.1 version of the ArcGIS for Server Security (January 2015) Patch prior to installing this patch to avoid any installation conflicts.

Introduction

Esri® announces the ArcGIS 10.2.1 for (Desktop, Engine, Server) Utilities and Telecom Update 2 Patch. This patch is the second in a series of updates targeting utility and telecom workflows, though it can be beneficial to all users of ArcGIS 10.2.1. The patch targets a number of issues related to the use of schematic diagrams, and also corrects issues with the st_geometry storage type, memory allocation, spatial indexes, performance, and more. This patch deals specifically with the issues listed below under Issues Addressed with this Patch.

Issues Addressed with this patch

  • BUG-000081231 - After disconnecting and connecting linear source features from a geometric network and updating the associated schematic diagram, a new schematic ID is generated for that feature and the vertices are removed.
  • BUG-000082028 - Standard editing workflows consume increasing amounts of memory and do not release it after editing has stopped.
  • BUG-000082630 - Versioned Difference Cursor single branch edits invert the "type" of change reported (e.g., Deletes become Inserts, Inserts become Deletes).
  • NIM088321 - User defined spatial index grids are not honored by ArcGIS when using the Add Spatial Index tool, even though the tool runs successfully.
  • NIM096460 - After dropping and rebuilding the geometric network and updating a schematic diagram containing schematic rules, network junction locations are not preserved.
  • NIM097184 - Creating a checkout in a 9.3.1 geodatabase fails with 10.2.1 Desktop.
  • NIM097983 - Optimize the opening of map documents by augmenting the geodatabase schema cache to include properties of the sde metadata.
  • NIM098475 - Spatial indexes are not created when creating a feature class on an ArcSDE 10 database from an ArcGIS Desktop 10.2 client.
  • NIM098196 - Exporting SDE schema using Oracle expdp generates ora-39127, ora-20098 and ora-06512 error about the spatial index created on GDB_items table having the st_grids parameter as commas when Oracle 11gR2 is used.
  • NIM098665 - Making a connection to a non-spatial Oracle database using either a Spatial Database Connection or an OLE Database Connection takes a significantly long time when there is a large amount of objects in the database.
  • NIM099484 - Provide a mechanism to enable instrumentation of memory usage when creating a feature cache in desktop.
  • NIM096111 - Rotating a point after a specific selection workflow on a geometric network rotates and shifts the entire geometric network.
  • NIM100182 - Bad SCHEMATICTID when diagrams get exported. Schematic features associated with GIS features which are not part of the geometric network are exported with "-2" at the end of their SCHEMATICTID.
  • NIM100823 - Rebuild the spatial index on a versioned feature class fails with an SRID mismatch error.
  • NIM100941 - Improve the Performance and Scalability of Creating and Syncing replicas by more efficiently caching database information.
  • NIM101461 - When feature classes with different SRIDs are used in an ST_intersection query, it fails with 'ORA-06530: Reference to uninitialized composite'.
  • NIM101468 - Unable to hide standalone tables using the IWorkspaceExtension.DataDictionaryTableNames method in ArcGIS 10.1 and above.
  • NIM101270 - Recalculating the feature extent on specific datasets returns the following error: "Failed to recalculate extent. The specified coordinate exceeds the valid coordinate range."
  • NIM101376 - ArcGIS for Desktop fails to save the connectivity rules for a specific geometric network.
  • NIM101746 - The Alter Field online help documentation page indicates that the Alter Field tool is available at all license levels however, the tool is unavailable at lower license levels.
  • NIM102077 - ArcGIS reports that an Oracle SDELOB or WKB feature class created in a pre-10.1 geodatabase does not have a spatial index when it does exist.
  • NIM102230 - Do not return the Documentation field on joined queries for Geodatabase internal metadata.
  • NIM102846 - When exporting diagrams into another schematic dataset using the Export Schematic Dataset process configured with GUIDs reattachment, the process expects GUIDs for each feature they contain. This is blocking when GUIDs are only missing for a feature class, in particular when this is missing for _Junctions.
  • NIM102848 - Creating a spatial index will pass values gathered from existing enterprise feature classes that may be invalid instead of passing correct values.
  • NIM102883 - When using a newer client (10.1+) against an older SQL server geodatabase (pre-10.1) through an application server connection, creation of a spatial index will fail on GEOMETRY or GEOGRAPHY feature classes with 'This SDE server does not support this client or operation'.
  • NIM102895 - Data exported via a XML workspace does not retain any 4-byte (or greater) characters in the data's attribute table.
  • NIM102996 - After dropping a spatial index on a binary feature class through an application server connection to a pre-10.1 geodatabase in SQL Server, ArcGIS is unable to determine the index is gone.
  • NIM103593 - File Geodatabase lock files should be opened as Read, rather than as Read/Write. This improves feature class/table creation performance.
  • NIM103683 - When script/query/constant attributes are configured on a schematic feature class for which the schematic features are not initialized, the attributes are not updated.
  • NIM103708 - Filter the AUDSYS, OJVMSYS, GSMADMIN_INTERNAL, DVSYS Oracle objects from connection in ArcGIS.
  • NIM103781 - The network index DESC query must only fetch the necessary attributes and not SELECT * when obtaining the USERID or ELEMENT mappings.
  • NIM104247 - Implement two new API functions for se_enable_schema_chache and se_disable_schema_cache.
  • NIM104317 - When fetching a network dataset index page, only fetch the pageblob.
  • NIM104321 - MDXT_xxx$% tables show up in ArcCatalog, connected to a 11.2.0.4 or 12.1.0.1 instance, and some are not deleted even when the feature class is deleted.

  • NIM086295- On Oracle ST_OrderingEquals is always returning the same value as ST_Equals.
  • NIM088921 - Importing an SDE schema dump fails with ORA-39083 and ORA-02309 on SDE.st_type_export.validate_spref using datapump impdp.
  • NIM089510 - Inconsistent results with st_astext_f query on polygons with more than 292 vertices.
  • NIM090071 - Labeling features based on join table's field throws 'ArcMap drawing errors' when the table and feature class are stored in different DBMS.
  • NIM094291 - The extent of data created in MicroStation DGN files is not correctly calculated in ArcMap 10.2 which causes the data to be displayed in the wrong location.
  • NIM094556 - Results from the Trace Geometric Network geoprocessing tool to trace connected are not consistent with the trace results from the Find Connected tool in the Utility Network Analyst toolbar.
  • NIM095455 - In an edit session, snapping stops working on a layer if a join exists on that layer.
  • NIM096135 - Provide option to create user schema geodatabases by a user other than SYS.
  • NIM096817 - Loading a large amount of coordinates via ST_Geometry function results in ORA-20004 and ORA-20000 errors.
  • NIM097346 - Extproc not initialized when a ST_Intersects query involving a versioned view and a base table is the first query run in the session.
  • NIM099098 - ST_ASTEXT Function is failing when the result set contains more than one record, and when the NUMPOINTS is

Installing this patch on Windows

Installation Notes:

System Administrators: A technical paper is available that discusses the enterprise deployment of ArcGIS 10.2.1 setups using Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS), System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), and Group Policy, including additional system requirements, suggestions, known issues, and Microsoft Software Installation (MSI) command line parameters. Deployment in a lockdown environment is also covered. ArcGIS 10.2.1 Enterprise Deployment.

Installation Steps:

ArcGIS 10.2.1 for Desktop, Engine, or Server must be installed before installing this patch.

    Download the appropriate file to a location other than your ArcGIS installation location.

NOTE: If double clicking on the MSP file does not start the setup installation, you can start the setup installation manually by using the following command:

Installing this patch on Linux

Installation Steps:

Complete the following install steps as the ArcGIS Install owner. The Install owner is the owner of the arcgis folder.

ArcGIS 10.2.1 for Engine or Server must be installed before installing this patch.

    Download the appropriate file to a location other than your ArcGIS installation location.

Checksum (Md5)
ArcGIS Engine ArcGIS-1021-E-UTU2-Patch-lx.tar 631899446347DBDCFFC6658F486F0D6F
ArcGIS for Server ArcGIS-1021-S-UTU2-Patch-lx.tar 2BB2B5EF330AEEA9D632B779B002C750

Upgrade a geodatabase

A geodatabase upgrade is required after applying this patch. To upgrade the geodatabase, follow the instructions in the help section specific to your database management system:

Patch Updates

Check the Patches and Service Packs page periodically for the availability of additional patches. New information about this patch will be posted here.

March 4, 2015: ArcGIS 10.2.1 for (Desktop, Engine, Server) Utilities and Telecom Update 2 Patch, ArcGIS for Server setups on Windows and Linux, are temporarily unavailable due to an issue reported registered datastores after installing the patch.

March 9, 2015: The ArcGIS for Server on Windows setup is available as a "B" version for download. The ArcGIS for Server Linux setup will not be updated. Users of ArcGIS for Server Linux must install the 10.2.1 version of the ArcGIS for Server Security (January 2015) Patch prior to installing this patch to avoid conflicts.

How to identify which ArcGIS products are installed

To determine which ArcGIS products are installed, choose the appropriate version of the PatchFinder utility for your environment and run it from your local machine. PatchFinder will list all products, hot fixes, and patches installed on your local machine.

Getting Help

Domestic sites, please contact Esri Technical Support at 1-888-377-4575, if you have any difficulty installing this patch. International sites, please contact your local Esri software distributor.


Watch the video: Tutorial 3-1: Loading data into a geodatabase (September 2021).