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How can I tell what licensing level my ESRI GIS server is from client tools?


From client tools, like ArcCatalog, is there a way to know if the GIS server I am connecting to is running under a workgroup or enterprise license? Also, is it possible to tell if the edition is basic, standard, or advanced?

I ask because we are trying to migrate a 9.3.1 database to 10 (migrate but not upgrade yet) using ArcCatalog. When we add a new database server in ArcCatalog the only options are to add a personal or workgroup database server. It seems like it is only looking for SQL Express instances, but it should be also be able to see full SQL Server (Enterprise) servers. We have ESRI enterprise licensing, but I want to know if it is possible to discover that from the client tools.

Help, About ArcCatalog shows ESRI ArcCatalog 10, ArcGIS Desktop 10 SP2, license type ArcInfo. This is the ArcCatalog (client) licensing, not the server.


This may not be a license issue, in Esri parlance, database servers are SQL Server Express instances only. ( help doc )

To connect to a full SQL Server DB, you need to make a database connection.

That said, I also would like to know if there is a way to check the license level of an ArcGIS Server instance, as I looked into it before without success.


ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1 quick start guide

ArcGIS Enterprise represents the evolution of Esri's GIS server technology into a complete GIS platform in your own infrastructure, supporting enterprises of any size. ArcGIS Enterprise provides a full Web GIS experience integrated with ArcGIS Online and ArcGIS Desktop. See the following prerequisites to get started:

  • ArcGIS Enterprise includes many components. See What's included for a list of components.
  • Review the system requirements for each component.
  • Administrative privileges are required for installation.
  • On Windows, Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 is required for installing the ArcGIS Server .NET Extension Support feature. ArcGIS Web Adaptor for IIS also requires Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5. This version of Microsoft .NET Framework can be downloaded from Microsoft.
  • Download and install the component. If you're upgrading, review Upgrading to ArcGIS 10.5.1. For help, see the corresponding installation guide available with the download. and authorize the software. If your Portal for ArcGIS organization will use a premium app, such as ArcGIS Pro or Drone2Map for ArcGIS, you will also need ArcGIS License Manager 10.5.1 to configure your premium app licenses to specify which members can use the software. See the Portal for ArcGIS Administrator Guide, License Manager Reference Guide, and the ArcGIS License Manager system requirements for more information.

Visit ArcGIS Enterprise for access to additional resources such as documentation and support.


See Requirements for using ArcGIS with databases in the cloud for information on support for database services and databases deployed in the cloud.

Any client machines that connect directly to SQL Server must have a SQL Server client installed. SQL Server clients for Microsoft Windows and Linux are distributed by Microsoft . SQL Server clients for Windows are also available on My Esri . You must install a client that is the same version or a newer version than the SQL Server database to which you want to connect. If you upgrade SQL Server , upgrade the SQL Server clients at the same time. When a version of SQL Server is no longer supported by ArcGIS, the corresponding SQL Server client library will no longer be supported either.

Supported SQL Server clients are as follows:

  • SQL Server 2019
    • Microsoft ODBC Driver 17 for SQL Server
    • Microsoft ODBC Driver 17 for SQL Server
    • SQL Server 2016
      • Microsoft ODBC Driver 17 for SQL Server
      • Microsoft ODBC Driver 13 or 13.1 for SQL Server
      • Microsoft ODBC Driver 17 for SQL Server
      • Microsoft ODBC Driver 13 or 13.1 for SQL Server
      • Microsoft ODBC Driver 11 for SQL Server

      When connecting from ArcGIS Server on Ubuntu to a supported version of SQL Server , you must install the Microsoft unixodbc-dev package on all ArcGIS Server machines in addition to the ODBC driver.


      Understanding ArcGIS Enterprise Components

      We are looking to roll out a base deployment of ArcGIS Enterprise and we're looking to fully understand all the pieces, and rather than read through a bunch of documentation, I thought I'd try GeoNet first to see if I could explain our current architecture and get some opinions on how we should move forward.

      • ArcGIS Server Advanced with Image Server role (10.5.1)
      • Web Adaptor 10.5.1 installed on reverse proxy configured to use Server listed above
      • Do NOT have Portal installed
      • Do NOT have Data Store installed
      • Use ArcGIS Online for Organizations for managing Web GIS (all web maps, Pro licensing, users, Open Data)
      • Use Web AppBuilder Developer Edition for creating apps that are self hosted on local web server

      The main piece of ArcGIS Enterprise we are struggling to understand is Portal, and where it fits into our current architecture and workflow. As mentioned, we currently use AGO for Organizations for managing all our Web GIS 'stuff', while publishing services to our ArcGIS Server.

      In order to start fully migrating to Pro, and to be able to publish services using Pro, as I understand it, we need to have Portal installed. I have always thought of Portal as AGO for Organizations installed locally, so I'm not fully understanding how we would use Portal. I think we are pretty pleased with using AGO for Organizations to manage our Web GIS (no maintenance on our end, etc. ) but if we have to use Portal to publish with Pro, so be it.

      1. Can we use Portal to pass through our published services to our GIS Server?
      2. Do we need to migrate any of our AGO for Organizations user accounts to Portal?
      3. What is a federated ArcGIS Server. and does it provide us any benefit?
      4. What is a hosting server. and does it provide us any benefit?
      5. Can the Data Store and Portal be placed on the same server? I doubt we would publish many hosted services that would use the Data Store.
      6. Does Portal need its own Web Adaptor? If so, can it be placed on the same proxy server as the one we use for our GIS Server?

      I understand some of these questions can probably become quite involved, but I'm assuming (perhaps that's bad on my part) we aren't the only organization that has this type of architecture (Server + AGO for Organizations) and are wondering how Portal and the Data Store fit into our future.

      by JonathanQuinn

      I imagine you'll get a few responses here, but I'll answer what I can. One of the important benefits to using Portal with your GIS Server rather than Online is that you have a central user store that controls access to Portal as well as your federated server and it's services. For example, if you were to create a secure service on your Server and then create a webmap using that service, your users need to sign into ArcGIS Online, and then sign in to reach the service. You need to manage distinct user stores which may get confusing. If you had Portal and a federated Server, and you create a webmap with that same secure service, once your users sign into the Portal, they're already authenticated with the same credentials to reach the service. You can also take advantage of single sign on and IWA to further reduce the number of user stores. This comes at a cost of maintenance and administration of infrastructure, so it's important to keep that in mind.

      Some organizations can't store data within ArcGIS Online, so using an AGOL account isn't an option for them if they want to publish hosted services through Pro, ArcMap, or any other client. They'll set up ArcGIS Enterprise, (which includes Portal, Server, and Data Store), within their own infrastructure.

      Below is an overview of some additional information regarding the difference between AGOL and Portal:

      In regards to your questions:

      Yes, you'll set up ArcGIS Enterprise, (Portal, Server, and Data Store), and then you can federate your existing Server so that the security is controlled by Portal.

      Up to you. You're managing content and accounts in separate locations, which could get tricky.

      A federated server is a server that has passed it's authentication on to Portal so that the Portal user store controls any access to services. The sharing model within Portal will determine who or which groups can access services.

      A hosting server is a federated server that you have selected to act as the server that will store any data copied to the server during publishing time. It gives you the ability to publish hosted services, run analysis tools, and add file based data directly to the webmap.

      • Can the Data Store and Portal be placed on the same server? I doubt we would publish many hosted services that would use the Data Store.

      Yes, as long as there are enough resources on the machine to effectively run both, (CPU/RAM). Many DBA's will likely tell you to have a dedicated machine for any databases.

      • Does Portal need its own Web Adaptor? If so, can it be placed on the same proxy server as the one we use for our GIS Server?

      Yes, it needs either a web adaptor or your own reverse proxy, (Apache, etc). Yes, it can be on the same server as the WA for your GIS Server. The names have to be unique.

      Thanks for your reply, it helps clear things up a bit. I have a few follow-up questions based on some of your responses:

      1. I do like the idea of our Portal and Server using the same identity store. As you mention, this can sometimes cause confusion for our users, whereas they are using one set of credentials for AGO and another set of credentials for accessing secured services. On Server, we currently use the built-in store for users and roles, meaning we are pretty flexible in allowing users from inside and outside our organization to view secure services if need be. If Portal and Server are using the same user store, is that user store allowed to have BOTH integrated enterprise (domain) accounts AND named user accounts? We like having the ability to use enterprise accounts in AGO for Organizations for users who have a domain account, however, there are some field workers who DO NOT have a domain account and we need the ability to create a named AGO account for them. Is this type of user store available for Portal as well. and if it is. the same user store gets passed along to our Server if federated, correct?
      2. Is there something analogous to Server 'roles' within Portal? I get that the user store is passed off to Portal, but within Server, using the built-in user store, users belong to roles and roles are what get used when assigning security to a service/folder. How are services made secure if using a Federated Server with Portal?
      3. How is a hosting server different from the Data Store. or are they one in the same? I thought the point of the Data Store is to give users the ability to create hosted feature services, run analysis tools, drag and drop files that contain geographic content, etc. Is a hosting server configured somewhere within Portal. or during install? Is a hosting server necessary?
      4. How are user accounts in Portal and AGO for Organizations tracked? For example, say we have 100 named user accounts available for AGO for Organizations. I already have an existing user account in AGO using my enterprise account. If I add my enterprise account to Portal, does that count as 2 accounts within our 100 user pool, even though it's the same credentials?
      5. Along the same lines as the question above, how are Pro licenses managed? Currently, all our Pro licenses are managed through AGO. When we install Portal, I'm assuming you can manage Pro licenses through there as well, just like you can in AGO, correct? Would we need to 'de-activate' / 'disable' a Pro license on AGO and re-configure Pro to look at Portal for licensing?
      6. Do you HAVE to federate your Server with Portal in order to have published services pass through Portal and be published directly to your Server? Or, does federating your Server with Portal simply mean the user store of Portal is passed to your Server?
      by JonathanQuinn

      1) If Portal and Server are using the same user store, is that user store allowed to have BOTH integrated enterprise (domain) accounts AND named user accounts? We like having the ability to use enterprise accounts in AGO for Organizations for users who have a domain account, however, there are some field workers who DO NOT have a domain account and we need the ability to create a named AGO account for them. Is this type of user store available for Portal as well. and if it is. the same user store gets passed along to our Server if federated, correct?

      If you use SAML/ADFS, you can have both enterprise accounts as well as built-in users within your Portal. It sounds like you've already done that within ArcGIS Online. The experience in Portal should be identical to AGO.

      2) Is there something analogous to Server 'roles' within Portal? I get that the user store is passed off to Portal, but within Server, using the built-in user store, users belong to roles and roles are what get used when assigning security to a service/folder. How are services made secure if using a Federated Server with Portal?

      Access to services is controlled by the sharing settings within Portal. If I, as a publisher, publish a service, it's automatically added as an item within My Content. By default, the service is not shared with everyone, meaning only me and Administrators within the Portal can reach the service. I can share that service with a group or groups and only members of that group can reach the service. If I share the service with the organization, anyone who is a named user within the Portal can reach the service. If I share the service with everyone, anyone who can access the REST endpoint can reach the service. I realize the link is specific to ArcMap, but it describes the sharing settings.

      Your users will be assigned roles as well. Some may be Viewers, some may be Publishers, a select few will be Administrators, and you can create custom roles.

      3) How is a hosting server different from the Data Store. or are they one in the same? I thought the point of the Data Store is to give users the ability to create hosted feature services, run analysis tools, drag and drop files that contain geographic content, etc. Is a hosting server configured somewhere within Portal. or during install? Is a hosting server necessary?

      A hosting server can only be set if you've registered the relational Data Store with the Server and you've federated that Server with Portal. The ArcGIS Data Store is really just storing the data used for the hosted services, they're still running on the hosting server, (which again, is a federated server, but set as the hosting server). The hosting server is set when you federate your server with Portal. Then, you'll have the option of setting it as the hosting server. Here are some key points:

      • A federated server is a server that you've added to the Portal that will use the Portals security store.
      • A hosting server is a federated server that you've selected to be a hosting server through My Organization
      • The relational ArcGIS Data Store has to be registered to the federated server to set that federated server as the hosting server

      A hosting server is only necessary if you plan to do any of those things listed.

      4) How are user accounts in Portal and AGO for Organizations tracked? For example, say we have 100 named user accounts available for AGO for Organizations. I already have an existing user account in AGO using my enterprise account. If I add my enterprise account to Portal, does that count as 2 accounts within our 100 user pool, even though it's the same credentials?

      ArcGIS Online and Portal use separate identity stores, therefore I believe the same user will count for 2 named users. I suggest you discuss that with your account manager.

      5) Along the same lines as the question above, how are Pro licenses managed? Currently, all our Pro licenses are managed through AGO. When we install Portal, I'm assuming you can manage Pro licenses through there as well, just like you can in AGO, correct? Would we need to 'de-activate' / 'disable' a Pro license on AGO and re-configure Pro to look at Portal for licensing?

      Licensing isn't really my strong suite, but I believe that's correct. You'll need to move those licenses to Portal. Your account manager may be able to clarify.

      6) Do you HAVE to federate your Server with Portal in order to have published services pass through Portal and be published directly to your Server? Or, does federating your Server with Portal simply mean the user store of Portal is passed to your Server?

      Federating is the easiest way to pass credentials between Portal and Server. Another option, though, is to add the service to your My Content and embed credentials within the item. Anyone that has access to the item will be able to reach the service as the credentials are embedded with the item.


      What's new in ArcGIS QuickCapture (October 2020)

      by IsmaelChivite

      ArcGIS QuickCapture is Esri's rapid field data collection mobile app. If you are not familiar with QuickCapture, have a look at this short video:

      We just updated ArcGIS QuickCapture across all supported platforms. The new build number is 1.7. With this new release, you can build much more powerful field data collection mobile apps, while keeping the end-user experience as simple as the single tap of a button. This video gives summarizes the highlights of this release:

      Bigger buttons, of course.

      With this update, you can configure your QuickCapture apps with bigger buttons. This is useful when authoring projects for large tablets, with very few or even a single button. Larger buttons help you take full advantage of the available screen real estate on the device, facilitating data capture.

      Enhanced Project User Inputs (Define lists from designer)

      When configuring your QuickCapture app, you can define a Project User Input. A Project User Input presents a dialog where information can be entered, prior to start capturing data. This information can then be used to automatically populate attributes of collected data. For example, say you are building a Pavement Condition QuickCapture app. You may want to configure a Project User Input for field crews to enter a charge code number or the ID of the field crew. That charge code or field crew ID can then be automatically added as an attribute to every feature collected. Checkhttps://community.esri.com/community/arcgis-quickcapture/blog/2019/10/06/understanding-user-inputs-i. for more details on Project User Inputs.

      Up until this release, you could only create free text Project User Inputs. That is, a dialog with either a single line or a multi line text input control. Starting with version 1.7, you can also present a list with well defined values. Using lists makes sense when you want to limit entries to a well known collection of choices. It is easier for users to pick an option than having to type.

      The animation below shows you can now create a Project User Input and define a list of values for it.

      Once you have your project input dialog defined, just as before, you can choose which buttons will make use of that value.

      Enhanced Project User Inputs (Remember previous entries)

      To facilitate quick data entry from end users, the QuickCapture mobile app now remembers previous Project User Input entries. In the animation on the side, for example, the Police Officer Reporter app presents a dialog for end users to enter the ID of the person that will collect data. Note that the dialog presents two options in a list right below the text input control. The end user can either enter a new ID, or tap on any of the previously entered IDs.

      The QuickCapture mobile app will list the three last entries. The idea listing previous entries is to accelerate data capture and reduce errors when entering this information.

      Locked Groups

      QuickCapture buttons can be logically organized in groups. Groups help end users navigate across QuickCapture apps that include many buttons.

      By default, groups can be collapsed and expanded by end users.With this update, the QuickCapture app author can decide to hide the handle to collapse and expand a group. This is useful when you want to make sure a set of buttons will always be visible to users. You can control the group properties from QuickCapture designer.

      Link buttons (launching any URL)

      Link buttons allow you to open other mobile or web apps right from within ArcGIS QuickCapture. For example, you may want to configure a button to open a live dashboard in a web browser, a PDF file or launch a Survey123 smart form. With link buttons you can convert your QuickCapture project into a launchpad for other applications.

      The animation below shows how you can add a new link button into a QuickCapture app, to launch a website.

      You can include dynamic content in your target URL. For example, you may want to add custom URL parameters to center a Web AppBuilder application at the user's location, or pass a filter into an ArcGIS Dashboard. For more information about URL parameters in ArcGIS Dashboards and Web AppBuilder, check the following links:

      In the animation below, we are passing the current latitude and longitude of the user when the link button is pushed. Note that dynamic content in the URL can be populated from device variables as well as from the Project User Input.

      You can really launch any URL from a link button. This includes URLs to launch mobile apps. For example, using app link syntax you can launch Survey123, Tracker, Collector, Navigator and even third party apps. Here are some links to help you better understand how to build URLs to launch other apps:

      Link buttons (launching Survey123)

      If you want to launch a Survey123 smart form from QuickCapture, you do not need to figure out how to build the custom URL link yourself. We have added a streamlined user experience so you can more easily launch Survey123 forms and pass parameters to them.

      You can select a survey and what dynamic data you want to pass into it.

      Once you configure a link button in this manner, Survey123 will be automatically invoked when you press the QuickCapture button.

      With link buttons, you can now model much more sophisticated data collection workflows. You can for example configure a few buttons to capture quick field observations and a button to launch Survey123 to do more involved reporting.

      More device variables

      Device variables in QuickCapture allow you to automatically populate attributes in the GIS features you collect. Device variables let you capture for example the exact time when a button is pushed, the speed and direction of travel, or the horizontal accuracy of your GPS. The complete list of device variables is available in the Configure a project—ArcGIS QuickCapture | Documentation help topic. In this release, we are adding the following new variables:

      • Photo: Lat, Lon, Heading
      • Travel: Cardinal direction
      • Location: DMS, DDM, USNG, MGRS
      • Device Info: App Version and Device Operating System
      • Length and Area

      EXIF metadata

      Starting with version 1.7 of QuickCapture, all photos taken from the mobile app will include EXIF metadata.


      Host on your web server

      Crowdsource Reporter can also be hosted on your organization's Microsoft Internet Information Service (IIS) web server. To host Crowdsource Reporter on your web server, complete the following steps:

      1. Download and unzip the Crowdsource Reporter application.
      2. Copy the contents to your web server so it can be accessed as a website or virtual directory. In Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS), the default web server directory is <your directory>Inetpubwwwroot.

      You may need to setup and use a proxy page to support sharing and secure services. View the Using the proxy page for details on installing and configuring a proxy page. If your site needs a proxy, the one that comes with the project will likely be sufficient after you have converted the site to an IIS application.

      If you do not see ASP.NET v4.0 or ASP.NET v4.5 as options in the menu, install and configure it with your web server.

      ID for the group that contains the maps to display in the application. This GUID can be found in the URL of the group.

      Icon shown in the top left corner of application.

      Change the favicon shown in the browser tab where the application is loaded.

      Text displayed below title on the splash page.

      Background image for splash page. Recommended dimensions are 640 x 960 px.

      Graphic that marks the location of a searched address

      Set to true to allow users to access the application without providing any credentials.

      This option has been deprecated and should remain set to false .

      Set to true to allow users to sign in using their Twitter credentials.

      This option has been deprecated and should remain set to false .

      Set to true to allow users to sign in using their ArcGIS credentials.

      Set to false to prompt users to share their location with the application and set to true to skip this prompt.

      Set to true to show the webmap description in the application.

      Set to true to show the map summary in the application.

      Set to true to show the map owner's name in the application.

      Set to true to show the map creation date in the application.

      Set to true to show the map modification in the application.

      Set to true to show the map licensing information in the application.

      Set to true to show the map access and use constraints in the application.

      Set to true to show the map tags in the application.

      Set to true to show the number of map views in the application.

      Set to true to show the average rating of the map in the application.

      By default, Crowdsource Reporter apps will show only one editable layer at a time. Optionally, choose to also display non-editable map layers for additional context. Only one editable layer is visible at a time, but all non-editable reference layers will display with each editable layer.

      Display the configured pop-up information for features in the uneditable reference layers. This requires that showNonEditableLayers be true as well.

      Message displayed when a report is submitted successfully.

      Color of the Submit a Report button.

      Text on the button that opens the submission form.

      Use the value bottom to position this button below the list of features and the value top to place it at the top of the list of features.

      Integer field that stores the vote count. Field name must be the same across all layers and maps.

      Text field in the comments tables that stores feedback. Field name must be the same across all layers and maps.

      The format of the comment form and the displayed comments can be determined either by specifying a field to display, or by choosing to use the pop-up configuration. If a field name is specified, this setting will apply to all comment tables that are displayed in the application. Choosing to use the pop-up configuration allows you to choose which fields to hide, display, and show in the form for each layer individually.

      Allow ArcGIS or social media authenticated users to edit their submissions. The application must also be configured to store the ID of the authenticated user with each report.

      Allow ArcGIS or social media authenticated users to delete their submissions. The application must also be configured to store the ID of the authenticated user with each report.

      To include a user ID with reports submitted by authenticated users, provide the name of a text field where this value should be stored. This information will only be stored on reports submitted to layers that have a field of this name. If a field of that name does not exist in a map, the ID associated with the account will not be recorded for reports submitted in that layer. The benefit to users who sign in to the app is that they can use the My List feature of the application to review, in one place, all the reports they have submitted.

      Optionally, store a text form of the report location. For point layers, the app will first attempt to store a search location. If the search is not used or if a new location is selected on the map the app will attempt to find an address for the report location. If no address is found the coordinates of the location will be stored. For line and polygon features, the app will attempt the same reverse-geocode or coordinate-storing workflow using the first vertex of the drawn location. This location-storing functionality will only be available for layers with a field of the specified (case-sensitive) name.

      When the application is loaded on a smartphone, users will se a list of nearby reports with an option to toggle to a map view. Alternatively, choose to load the map view of the reports first, with an option to toggle to the list view.

      Choose to display the in-app help window as a splash screen once users have signed in to the app.

      Choose where the report details section should appear on the submission form - Top , Middle , or Bottom .

      Choose where the attachments section should appear on the submission form - Top , Middle , or Bottom .

      Choose where the location section should appear on the submission form - Top , Middle , or Bottom .

      Set the zoom level to which the map should zoom when a record is selected from the table. Specify how near (larger number) or far (smaller number) the map should zoom relative to the ground.

      Use the value false to only honor the zoom level when searching for an address. Use the value true to also use the zoom value when zooming to a selected feature.

      Set to true to allow searching by USNG coordinates

      Set to true to allow searching by MGRS coordinates

      Set to true to allow searching by Latitude/Longitude coordinates

      Optionally, restrict report submission to a specific geography by specifying the name of an uneditable polygon layer with features representing the areas where reports should be permitted. This restriction will be imposed on all maps accessed through the application containing an uneditable polygon layer with this name.

      Choose a color for the text elements found on the sign in screen.

      Choose a background color for the sign in option graphics found on the sign in screen.

      Choose a foreground color for the sign in option graphics found on the sign in screen.

      Choose to enable or disable the help panel.

      Specify the text for the link on the splash page from which this content will be accessible.

      Provide a title for the help window.

      Provide the content that will be displayed in the panel. This can include links and images, and can be formatted using HTML.

      Optionally, choose to separate the content accessible from the sign in page and the content accessible in the app, for example, to provide terms of use separate form instructional content.

      Provide a title for the help window that is accessible from the sign in page.

      Provide the content for the help window that is accessible from the sign in page.

      When users choose to share their location with the application, the app will load all features within a specified radius of that location, sorted by proximity, and will provide them the option to expand that search radius. Use the bufferRadius and bufferUnit parameters to specify the initial search area for the application. Users can then expand this search area in increments of the same distance.

      Unit of measure for bufferRadius.

      The details section of the form is built using the fields marked as editable in the pop-up configuration. Configure a header for the report details section of the form.

      Configure a header for the report location section of the form. The report location can be drawn on the map or found by searching for an address.

      Configure a header for section of the form where photos and other supporting files can be added to the report. This section is only available when attachments are enabled on the layer.

      Provide a message to display when the application cannot access any maps with editable layers to display to the current user.

      Hex value of the color of the text in the application header.

      Hex value of the color of the background of the application body.

      Hex value of the color of the text in the application body.

      Hex value of the color of the background of buttons.

      Hex value of the color of the text and icons on buttons.

      Field used to sort the reports, when the device's location is not shared with the application.

      Order in which to sort the reports either descending( DECS ) or ascending ( ASC ).

      Title of window that displays when reporting period is closed.

      Content of window that displays when reporting period is closed.

      Choose to display a basemap toggle. Requires a value for basemapGroup .

      ID of the group containing the basemaps that will be available in the basemap toggle. Leave blank to use the organization basemap group.

      Choose to display a map legend.

      Message displayed when geographic restrictions are configured and a user attempts to submit a report that is located outside the accepted geography.

      The date that users can begin submitting reports, comments and votes through the application.

      The time that users can begin submitting reports, comments and votes through the application.

      The last date that users can submit reports, comments and votes through the application.

      The last time that users can submit reports, comments and votes through the application.

      Message displayed when a comment is successfully submitted.

      Sort comments ascending using the value ASC or descending using the value DESC .


      Gold Partners

      Welcome New Gold Partner!

      Nearmap brings the real world to you current, clear aerial imagery and 3D location data for businesses and Government agencies. Inspect, measure, or analyze locations in detail, without leaving your office.

      Nearmap&rsquos key features include:

      • Consistently sub 3&rdquo GSD imagery
      • Cloud- based platform, gives you 24/7 access
      • Historical data, as far back as 5-6 years
      • Views from all cardinal directions
      • 3D data in textured mesh, DSM, true ortho, and Point Cloud
      • Easily exportable data into your preferred GIS/CAD platform

      (compatible with: Esri, Bentley, Autodesk, QGIS)

      Industries we serve amongst many others:

      Urban Planning - There's no such thing as a clear satellite view. With current aerial maps, you can be everywhere (in high resolution) without going anywhere.

      • Monitor growth over time with current and historical imagery
      • Swiftly view property context and examine the big picture
      • Measure proximity to existing infrastructure or utilities

      Transportation - Knowledge is power. For the transportation industry, this adage still rings true. Managing assets, integrating data, operational efficiency and security are top priorities.

      • Monitor field crew progress easily
      • Streamline planning and operations
      • Create smarter, more secure transportation
      • Report on inventories and assets

      Public Safety - Safely route police, fire, and emergency response teams. And when on site, coordinate actions on the ground with current imagery.

      • Research and anticipate hotspots or areas of concern.
      • Actively plan and update emergency routes and contingencies
      • Provide first responders with timely, up-to-date location intel

      Property assessment - Multiple captures per year tell the story of what&rsquos been built, installed, or demolished.

      • View change over time and determine taxable activity
      • Accurately measure area, height, and radius.
      • Shorten inquiries and appeals to keep your time productive

      Nearmap&rsquos own patented camera systems and processing software allows us to capture wide-scale urban areas in the U.S., Canada, Australia and New Zealand multiple times each year, making fresh content instantly. We make this complex technology incredibly simple to use - access consistent, quality data at an unprecedented scale instantly. At Nearmap, we transform the way you work. Founded in Australia, Nearmap is one of the 10 largest aerial survey companies in the world by annual data collection volume and is publicly listed in the ASX 200. Learn more.


      Experiences Teaching Free and Open Source GIS at the Community College Level

      Like schools across the globe, the Geographic Information Technology (GIT) program at Central New Mexico Community College (CNM) teaches and trains students in the principles of GIS and in the types of applications for which it is used. Our program has always been Esri-centric, as its products are the industry standard. As our field expands, more and more people use free and open source software (FOSS) to accomplish the same tasks. Reliable FOSS alternatives to proprietary software have emerged.

      In the interest of keeping our curriculum both cutting edge and thorough, I developed, and now teach, a three-credit course called Introduction to Open Source GIS and Web Mapping.The GeoTech Center funded the course development and the full course curriculum will be made available on its website in the near future. The primary goal is to teach students the principles of free and open source software for GIS (FOSS4G) as they create the same workflows and maps that they've already mastered using proprietary software. The only prerequisite for the course is Introduction to GIS. As a longtime proponent of FOSS principles, I am excited to bring these alternatives into the college classroom.

      Why Teach FOSS GIS?

      FOSS4G comprises one of the fastest evolving sectors of GIS. A wide variety of FOSS4G products are now available including those for the desktop, Web server, Web client, spatial database and mobile GIS. While FOSS4G has been around since the 1980s, recent years have seen the software becoming more mature, interoperable and user friendly. Historically, ease of access and installation has been a major hurdle for those wanting to transition to FOSS GIS software. Now there are intuitive Windows installers for all the leading packages. Those who prefer to work on Macs appreciate that most FOSS4G software can be installed natively on the Mac OS.

      Employers are beginning adopt FOSS4G, often using a mix of proprietary and FOSS to create efficient workflows. This is due to the aforementioned strengths and because there are no licensing fees. This trend is likely to continue as organizations try to stay current in a rapidly changing field, and look to reduce financial overhead. Two local state agencies have recently included knowledge of FOSS4G as a desired skill for applicants. Since job placement is a high priority in our program, it makes sense to train our graduates in FOSS4G. GIS is simply a tool. Why not expose students to a fuller toolbox?

      During the semester we explore a variety of tools including desktop packages Quantum GIS and GRASS GIS the GDAL/OGR command line utilities both the SpatiaLite, PostgreSQL/PostGIS spatial databases, and MapServer for publishing spatial data to the Web . The students learn how to use these tools for cartography, data conversion, projection management, basic analyses and Web mapping. The course sticks to a pure FOSS paradigm. Assignments and lectures are provided in open document format. Students use Open Office and are required to use the open document format for all collected work.

      The first portion of the course is focused on the principles and history of free and open source software. In a capitalist society there is something counter-intuitive to why a community of people creates software and gives it away for free. To put this in context the licensing schemes, development models and business models of both FOSS and proprietary software are compared and contrasted. Students learn that the software may be free, as in free beer, but that there are still costs involved. To migrate wholly or partially to FOSS GIS software, training and time to migrate data and workflows are obviously required.

      In addition to FOSS software, students are introduced to open data and open standards. During the desktop portion they learn about OpenStreetMap (OSM). OSM is a freely editable map of the world that has numerous applications in both FOSS and proprietary software. During the Web portion they learn about open standards via the Open GeospatialConsortium (OGC) standards: Web Map Service(WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS) and Web Coverage Service (WCS). They publish a WMS service in MapServer, and see how that service can be consumed by a MapServer client, QGIS and ArcGIS.

      In addition to lab assignments, students work on a software evaluation final project. For this component they research a FOSS4G software product not being covered elsewhere in the course. The project involves evaluating the software via a small GIS project. They write a report detailing the software's strengths and weaknesses, and its suitability to their project. During the last week of class they demonstrate their software package and present their findings to the class. This exposes the entire class to a larger number of new tools.

      The course concludes with an introduction to both Web mapping and the Web in general. This is the only place in our GIT curriculum where the Internet is covered, so basics like the server-client relationship are introduced. Google Maps (although not open source) is used as a gentle introduction to Web mapping. Each student then creates a basic Web mapping application using Apache and MapServer and learns how to customize it, and add data to it.

      Lessons Learned

      Teaching this course has shown me that an Introduction to GIS class taught with Esri software sets a deep foundation in Esri as much as GIS. It has also made it clear just how much GIS language and how many procedures come from Esri. Migrating to any new GIS software requires a move from Esri-centric language and workflows to new ways of accomplishing the same tasks. For beginning GIS students, shifting from ArcMap to QGIS requires a retraining of the brain. For example, the terms “symbology” and “spatial reference” in ArcGIS might become “style” and “coordinate reference system” in QGIS. Just these small differences cause many students pause. I strive to tie terms and tools from the new software being taught, back to what they know in ArcGIS.

      GIS courses almost universally rely on packaged labs and students often fall into the trap of just following directions. By re-doing the same task in a FOSS package they begin to think more critically about how and why something is being done. Their conceptual understanding of GIS grows considerably and students who take this class leave with a more solid GIS foundation. Perhaps this effect could also be achieved by putting more real world issues into labs, where software bugs or data that are difficult to work with are encountered, to teach students how to problem solve. However, FOSS4G deepens their problem-solving skills while giving them a fuller toolbox.

      There are always some students who do not embrace the FOSS paradigm. However, most students are shocked to discover how many capable FOSS GIS software packages exist and are excited that they can just download and install them, even on a Mac. They ask questions like, "Why isn't everyone using QGIS?" Frequently students end the semester wanting more. There is certainly room in our program for a FOSS GIS course that dives deeper into spatial analysis and modeling. The Web portion of the course could be expanded to an entire semester. In the near term, one of my goals is to have other GIS faculty take this course so that they can begin to weave FOSS4G into other courses. The FOSS software is intentionally left installed in our GIS labs throughout the year, even during semesters when the course is not being taught. This allows students to use it for their final projects and serves as a reminder of FOSS as an option.

      It is very rewarding to expose students to this world and I hope that it becomes more commonplace for colleges and universities to offer similar courses.


      Miscellaneous

      What type of the person do we need for configuration part?

      The person in charge of your schematic dataset configuration must have a good knowledge of the data and understand the needs of the users who will generate and consume the diagrams.

      Can a linear reference data using the schematic links features as the route?

      Yes, but that data needs to be in a format that is suitable for consumption in Schematics.

      For linear referencing, Schematics provides particular type of schematic features, called node-on-links and sublinks. Those objects are represented on link schematic features, their reference links, and depend on those reference links—for example, when a reference link moves, all its node on links and sublinks also move when a reference link is removed, its node on links and sublinks are also automatically removed, etc. Node on links and sublinks can be placed at a relative or absolute distance from the origin or extremity of their reference links. They can bring their own attributes, display with their own custom symbols and labels.

      Does Schematics consider Z values or just X and Y coordinates?

      No, Schematics doesn't consider Z values. It only works from X and Y coordinates.

      Is there a way to add an HTML pop-up to explain to the end-user of a schematic diagram a particular point?

      Yes, you can configure an HTML Popup on schematic features in the exact same way you can do on standard GIS features. Moreover, when you have configured all the HTML pop-ups you want to display from the schematic features contained in a given diagram, you can export the schematic diagram layer as a layer file and import this layer as the default for its diagram template. Then, the HTML pop-ups will be available in all existing and future diagrams based on this diagram template.

      Can you export a diagram to AutoCAD?

      Not directly, but there is a workaround.

      The schematic features contained in your diagrams are all stored in specific feature classes in your schematic dataset. Since those specific feature classes mix features coming from several diagrams, you can first run the Convert Diagram To Features GP tool to export the diagram content you want in separate feature classes. Then, you can use the Export To CAD GP tool to export the resulting feature classes to CAD.

      I have never used Schematics . What is the best way to learn using Schematics?

      • Schematics in ArcMap tutorial exercises allows you to find out what you can do with Schematics in ArcMap.
      • Schematics Configuration tutorial focuses on Schematics configuration using Schematic Dataset Editor.

      Where do you find the Schematics toolbar?

      Once you've installed ArcGIS for Desktop with the ArcGIS Schematics extension , the Schematics toolbars are available in ArcMap. There are three Schematics toolbars—Schematic, Schematic Editor, and Schematic Network Analyst. Those toolbars regroup commands and tools to generate, update, edit and analyze your schematic diagrams.

      Within Catalog, when the ArcGIS Schematics extension is enabled, you have access to another set of Schematics functions which allow you to manage your schematic datasets, folders, and diagrams.

      How can you add features (equipments) to an existing electric diagram?

      • When your diagrams come from a geometric network, you can simply append new features in a diagram by updating it using the Append new features to the active diagram option.
      • Suppose you generated a diagram at a time from a trace executed on your utility network that was stopped at some locations due to the status of GIS equipments. In this case, if the equipments status changed until the diagram generation and you update your diagram using the Synchronize against original selection/trace/query option, you will automatically get new features in the update diagram if the trace now executes beyond these equipments.
      • You can also digitize schematic features in your diagrams if you want. There are no out-of-the-box digitizing tools, but within the ArcObjects SDK for the Microsoft .NET Framework setup, you will find an add-in tool you can use to digitize schematic features in your diagrams.

      How can I Program Schematics with 'python geoprocessing'?

      The Schematics toolbox installed with ArcGIS for Desktop contains tools to perform the most fundamental operations on diagrams that is, generation and update. This allows you to set up batch programs to automate the update of existing diagrams or the generation of new diagrams.