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Mt. San Jacinto College - Geosciences


  • Environmental Science 101
    This text will challenge you to develop critical thinking skills for confronting global issues and may even impact the way you approach your daily life. Environmental science is an interdisciplinary field that draws heavily on the sciences but assumes that humanity (or any other group of organisms) maintains a central focus. This course will overview some basic concepts of the “hardsciences,” (chemistry, biology, et cetera) and will then focus on issues that confront humanity today.

Enroll at MSJC

Fall classes begin August 16, 2021.
Check your MSJC student email for your Registration Appointment.

Admissions Requirements

Residents of California who have graduated from high school, passed the California High School Proficiency Examination, or are 18 or older and can profit from instruction may attend Mt. San Jacinto College. Out-of-state residents and citizens of other countries here on student visas may also attend Mt. San Jacinto College, subject to regulations that can be obtained from the Enrollment Services Office. These students will be required to pay non-resident tuition fees.

New and returning students must complete an application for admission, which will provide the college with demographic information about students. Federal or state law, or college policy requires this information. Other information will assist the college in determining whether the student needs to be referred to orientation or placement programs. It is highly recommended that students provide the college with official transcripts from high school and previous college work at the time of admission.

Policy on Open Enrollment

Unless specifically exempted by statute, every course, course section or class which is to be reported for state apportionment, is open for enrollment and participation by any person who has been admitted to the college and who meets the prerequisite of such course as defined in Title 5, section 58106 of the California Administrative Code.

Summer Session (if offered)

During the Summer a full course of study is compressed into six weeks to eight weeks therefore the college has established a maximum units a student can carry during the Summer session and is subject to change.

Off-Campus Centers

Courses are offered at a variety of high school campuses and other off-campus sites. Check the current schedule of classes for information about course offerings and locations.

FasTrac, Late Start, Off-cycle Offerings

The college provides a wide variety of specially scheduled courses such as FasTrac, Late Start, and courses that are not contained within one of the regular academic terms. All credit courses offered, regardless of scheduling option, meet the requirements and standards established by the college, and result in the award of full college credit.

Enrollment Services Department Learning Outcomes

The Enrollment Services Office provides numerous services to students and members of the community. General information about the college is provided. Petitions to enter class late, transcripts, credit by examination and enrollment verification are all initiated in this office. Student academic records, courses taken, units attempted, units earned, grades, grade points, graduation date, and other data are maintained in this office.


Our outreach efforts comprise of targeted emails based on students’ academic disciplines and career interests as well as collaborating with other departments to engage in MSJC’s academically diverse community. It is important to us to provide responsive resources that are improved every year through unique student feedback.

Our employer development efforts include contacting major employers in fields of interest to our students as well as regular contact with our local employers, encouraging them to post jobs for students. Our Career Centers also have jobs listings available for students to view.


Courses

Courses numbered 1-69 are non-degree applicable and may not be used to meet graduation requirements. Units represented in the course MUST be replaced by (an) additional course(s) in order to meet graduation unit requirements for associate degrees or certificates.

Courses numbered 70-79 are intended for students with learning disabilities. Students may count a maximum of six units from each program for graduation, but such courses do not replace other English or math graduation requirements. In rare cases these courses may be accepted at a transfer institution. Final determination regarding the transfer of college credit rests with the individual receiving institution.

Courses numbered 80-98 are academic courses not transferable to four-year institutions but applicable to non-transfer associate’s degrees and certificates. For purposes of non-transfer associate-degree graduation, state regulations limit general math courses in the category to Math 094 (Accelerated Algebra) or higher. In rare cases these courses may be accepted at a transfer institution. Final determination regarding the transfer of college credit rests with the individual receiving institution.

Courses numbered 100-298 are full collegiate level courses for which transfer articulation, C-ID transfer equivalents, or lower-division comparable courses at a UC or CSU exist. The courses are certified by the college to be of baccalaureate level and meet the criteria in California Code of Regulations Title 5 Education Codes 55002, 55005, and 55061-55063 termed “standard of rigor” for associate degree and transfer-level courses. Courses at this level are applicable to non-transfer and transfer associate degrees, ADTs, and certificates. Final determination regarding the transfer of college credit rests with the individual receiving institution.

Courses numbered 299/699/899 are Special Projects created to provide academic opportunities for students who are capable of independent work with interest and previous coursework within a specific subject field. These projects are student specific, require research, and must be determined and supervised by a discipline faculty. The scope of the project will determine the number of units available between 1-3, and a contract must be completed prior to beginning the project. Courses numbered 299 and 699 are transferable to CSU as elective credit and can be applied to non-transfer and transfer associate degrees and certificates. Courses numbered 899 can be applied to non-transfer associate degrees and certificates. Final determination regarding the transfer of college credit for Special Projects rests with the individual receiving institution

​Courses numbered 500-698 are full collegiate academic and career education courses. These courses are traditionally highly specialized courses and typically post-Baccalaureate certificates or minors taught at the upper division. The courses are certified by the college to meet the criteria in California Code of Regulations Title 5 Education Codes 55002, 55005, and 55061-55063 termed “standard of rigor” for associate degree and transfer level courses. Courses at this level are applicable to non-transfer associate degrees and certificates. These career education courses transfer to CSU as elective units only the course content will be determined after transfer by the individual institution. Final determination regarding the transfer of college credit rests with the individual receiving institution which may also have unit limitations for these courses.

Courses numbered 549 are Cooperative Education Program (CWEE) Work Experience courses that provide on-the-job learning related to a student’s educational or occupational goals. These courses are offered by numerous disciplines please see Cooperative Education Program (CWEE) for more details. Courses at this level are applicable to non-transfer associate degrees and certificates. Final determination regarding the transfer of CWE college credit rests with the individual receiving institution.

Courses numbered 700-898 are career education courses intended for employment and which do not transfer to a university. The courses are certified by the college to meet the criteria in California Code of Regulations Title 5 Education Codes 55002, 55005, and 55061-55063 termed “standard of rigor” for associate degree. Courses at this level are applicable to non-transfer associate degrees and certificates.

Courses numbered 900-998 are Noncredit courses intended to assist students in attaining skills for personal, academic, and professional goals including English as a Second Language, citizenship, basic skills, health and safety, disabilities, parenting, home economics, courses for older adults, short-term career education programs, and workforce preparation. These courses are free to students but do not earn credits and will not transfer to a university. The courses are certified by the college to meet the criteria in California Code of Regulations Title 5 Education Codes 55000, 55002, 55003, 55005, and 55061-55064 termed “standard of rigor.” Courses at this level are non-degree applicable and may not be used to meet graduation requirements.

Specific prefix designation HEP are Honors Studies courses considered a capstone for completion of the Honors program. Students must be admitted into the Honors Enrichment Program before they are eligible to enroll in HEP courses. HEP courses are CSU transferable at time of transfer. UC course unit acceptance is determined after transfer and may not be applied to the UC 60 unit admission requirement. Final determination regarding the transfer of college credit rests with the individual receiving institution.

Course Descriptions

Course descriptions are arranged by subject and area distinguished by identifying numbers and course titles. The credit value of each course is indicated in semester units. Each unit represents one hour per week of lecture or recitation or a longer time in laboratory or other activity not requiring outside preparation. Some courses may be repeated for credit, but only when explicitly indicated. Students wishing to repeat a course for the purpose of recalculating the grade-point average should refer to rules regarding “Repeating a Course.” Prerequisite organization and the course description are listed below each course title. Students should read this material carefully to be sure that they meet prerequisites and that course content meets their needs and interest. A schedule of classes issued at the opening of each term lists courses offered.

Prerequisite

A prerequisite is a course (or qualification) which must be taken before a student may register for a subsequent course. It is the student’s responsibility to comply with prerequisites of all courses for which they enroll. Course prerequisites are listed in this catalog and in the online course search engine.

The most stringent placement restrictions are prerequisites. If a prerequisite is listed for a course, it means that the discipline faculty and department via the curriculum process have determined that students who lack the prerequisite are highly unlikely to succeed in the course. Therefore, the student MUST meet the prerequisite listed before enrolling in the course.

Corequisite

A corequisite is a course which must be taken prior to or at the same time as another course. If a corequisite is listed for a course, it means that the discipline faculty and department via the curriculum process have determined that students who do not take the corequisite course are highly unlikely to succeed in the course. Therefore, the student either MUST have met the corequisite prior to enrollment in the course or MUST take the corequisite course in the same term.

Recommended Course Preparation

In order to enroll students in courses that best meet their needs and skills, the college has developed several levels of placement information.

If recommended preparation is listed, it means that the faculty strongly recommends that the student meet the recommended preparation before enrolling. The skill or course listed in the note has been determined to be an important preparation to the course. While the student may well pass the course without the skill or course listed, a better grade, better understanding and better performance are likely if the note is followed. Under some conditions, a student may be provisionally enrolled in a course while waiting to determine whether or not a pre-or corequisite has been met. If it is subsequently determined that the prerequisite or corequisite has not been met, the student may be dropped from the course administratively and enrollment fees related to the course refunded.


Transfer Preparation

MSJC offers a wide range of course work that prepares students for the workforce or for transfer to four-year colleges and universities. All four-year institutions prescribe their own standards for course evaluation and admissions. Courses that fulfill major requirements for an associate degree in a program at MSJC might not be the same as those required for transfer into a similar major at a four-year university. Please meet with a Counselor to confirm transfer requirements.


Transfer Preparation

MSJC offers a wide range of course work that prepares students for the workforce or for transfer to four-year colleges and universities. All four-year institutions prescribe their own standards for course evaluation and admissions. Courses that fulfill major requirements for an associate degree in a program at MSJC might not be the same as those required for transfer into a similar major at a four-year university. Please meet with a Counselor to confirm transfer requirements.

Transfer students are advised to do research on prospective majors and careers. The MSJC Career/Transfer Center and MSJC catalog can be helpful tools. Students interested in transferring to CSU’s or UC’s can access major preparation by visiting http://www.assist.org. All students are advised to meet with a counselor at least once a semester to create or update their comprehensive education plan.


Transfer Preparation

MSJC offers a wide range of course work that prepares students for the workforce or for transfer to four-year colleges and universities. All four-year institutions prescribe their own standards for course evaluation and admissions. Courses that fulfill major requirements for an associate degree in a program at MSJC might not be the same as those required for transfer into a similar major at a four-year university. Please meet with a Counselor to confirm transfer requirements.


Mt. San Jacinto College lays foundation for new stadium in Menifee

Construction of Mt. San Jacinto College’s Athletics & Kinesiology Complex is moving along.

More than 30 trucks rumbled onto the Menifee Valley Campus on Thursday, June 10, to pour concrete for the foundation of a new stadium.

The $41 million project, which broke ground March 23, will feature a 5,000-seat stadium and field house, softball field and sand volleyball courts. The site will host games and events as soon as fall 2022, a college news release states.

Crews at Mt. San Jacinto College on Thursday, June 10, 2021, pour concrete for the stadium portion of its $41 million Athletics & Kinesiology Complex at the Menifee Valley Campus. (Courtesy of Mt. San Jacinto College)

Workers at Mt. San Jacinto College on Thursday, June 10, pour concrete for the stadium portion of its $41 million Athletics & Kinesiology Complex at the Menifee Valley Campus. The project will feature a 5,000-seat stadium and field house, softball field and sand volleyball courts. (Courtesy of Mt. San Jacinto College)

“This first pour is a milestone,” Superintendent/President Roger Schultz said in the release. “We are finally able to see the long-awaited stadium materialize. This complex will provide the community with a game-changing venue that will not only host our games and graduation ceremonies, but also fundraisers and other events with our community partners.”

The college district’s 2014 voter-approved Measure AA, a $295 million facilities bond, is paying for construction of the stadium, which will include classrooms, offices, fitness/weight rooms, lockers, team rooms and a press box, the release states.

Measure AA also funded renovations of a Menifee Valley Campus building into a new Student Center, which opens in fall, according to the release. Along with matching state funds, the measure is funding construction of Science Technology Engineering Math buildings at the San Jacinto and Menifee Valley campuses in the next few years. It funded purchase of the Temecula Valley Campus that will open to students in fall as well as other improvements at each of the district’s four campus locations.


Ohio University recognizes transfer credit from courses taken at Mt. San Jacinto College. As you plan your transfer to OHIO, following this guide will allow you to complete your Tier 1 and 2 general education requirements toward a bachelor's degree at OHIO while attending Mt. San Jacinto College. This is not an exhaustive list of transfer courses. In fact, every college-level course at Sinclair Community College is transferable to Ohio University.

Erin Drake
Admissions Advisor
[email protected]
740.593.4103


Watch the video: SCFA Football Week 9: Mt San Jacinto at AVC - 11219 - 2pm (October 2021).